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Fluoroplastics, Volume 2
 
 

Fluoroplastics, Volume 2, 2nd Edition

Melt Processible Fluoropolymers - The Definitive User's Guide and Data Book

 
Fluoroplastics, Volume 2, 2nd Edition,Sina Ebnesajjad,ISBN9781455731978
 
 
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William Andrew

9781455731978

9781455731985

766

276 X 216

An all-encompassing handbook and unique reference for melt-processible fluoropolymers, including their material properties, fabrication, and applications

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Key Features

  • Exceptionally broad and comprehensive coverage of melt processible fluoropolymers processing and applications
  • Provides a practical approach, written by long-standing authorities in the fluoropolymers industry
  • Thoroughly updated and significantly expanded revision covering new technologies and applications, and addressing the changes that have taken place in the fluoropolymer markets

Description

Fluoroplastics, Volume 2: Melt Processible Fluoropolymers - The Definitive User's Guide and Data Book compiles the working knowledge of the polymer chemistry and physics of melt processible fluoropolymers with detailed descriptions of commercial processing methods, material properties, fabrication and handling information, technologies, and applications, also including history, market statistics, and safety and recycling aspects.

Both volumes of Fluoroplastics contain a large amount of specific property data useful for users to readily compare different materials and align material structure with end use applications.

Volume Two concentrates on melt-processible fluoropolymers used across a broad range of industries, including automotive, aerospace, electronic, food, beverage, oil/gas, and medical devices.

This new edition is a thoroughly updated and significantly expanded revision covering new technologies and applications, and addressing the changes that have taken place in the fluoropolymer markets.

Readership

Engineers and other professionals that use and process fluoropolymers across different industries in all important segments including automotive, aerospace, electronic, pharmaceutical, food, beverage, chemical processing, semiconductor, furniture, printing/publishing, lubricant oil/grease, oil/gas, medical device, and plastic compounding. Professionals involved in polymer manufacturing and part fabrication. End-users of fluoropolymers and students.

Sina Ebnesajjad

Sina Ebnesajjad is the series editor of Plastics Design Library (PDL) published in the William Andrew imprint of Elsevier. This Series is a unique series, comprising technology and applications handbooks, data books and practical guides tailored to the needs of practitioners. Sina was the editor-in-chief of William Andrew Publishing from 2005 to 2007, which was acquired by Elsevier in 2009. He retired as a Senior Technology Associate in 2005 from the DuPont fluoropolymers after nearly 24 years of service. Sina founded of FluoroConsultants Group, LLC in 2006 where he continues to work. Sina earned his Bachelor of Science from the School of Engineering of the University of Tehran in 1976, Master of Science and PhD from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, all in Chemical Engineering. He is author, editor and co-author of fifteen technical and data books including five handbooks on fluoropolymers technology and applications. He is author and co-author of three books in surface preparation and adhesion of materials, two of which are in their second editions. Sina has been involved with technical writing and publishing since 1974. His experiences include fluoropolymer technologies (polytetrafluoroethylene and its copolymers) including polymerization, finishing, fabrication, product development, failure analysis, market development and technical service. Sina holds six patents.

Affiliations and Expertise

Fluoroconsultants Group, Chadds Ford, PA, USA

View additional works by Sina Ebnesajjad

Fluoroplastics, Volume 2, 2nd Edition

  • Dedication
  • Preface to Second Edition
  • Acknowledgments to Second Edition
  • 1. Introduction to Fluoropolymers
    • 1.1. Coming of Age of Polymer Science
    • 1.2. Roy Plunkett's Story
    • 1.3. Commercialization of PTFE
    • 1.4. Developmental History of Fluoropolymers
    • 1.5. Trends in Application Development
    • 1.6. Globalization: Present and Future
  • 2. Production and Market Statistics
    • 2.1. Growth of Fluoropolymers
    • 2.2. Regional Consumption of Fluoropolymers
    • 2.3. Consumption of Fluoropolymers
  • 3. From Fundamentals to Applications
    • 3.1. Introduction
    • 3.2. Uniqueness of Fluorine
    • 3.3. Fluorine Characteristics
    • 3.4. What are Fluoropolymers?
    • 3.5. Fundamental Properties of Fluoropolymers
    • 3.6. Developmental History of Fluoropolymers
    • 3.7. Examples of Uses of Fluoropolymers
  • 4. Fluoropolymers: Properties and Structure
    • 4.1. Introduction
    • 4.2. Impact of F and C–F Bond on the Properties of PTFE
    • 4.3. Copolymers of TFE
    • 4.4. Reaction Mechanism
    • 4.5. Effect of Solvents on Fluoropolymers
    • 4.6. Molecular Interaction of Fluoropolymers: Low Friction and Low Surface Energy
    • 4.7. Conformations and Transitions of PTFE
    • 4.8. Conformations and Transitions of PCTFE
    • 4.9. Conformations and Transitions of FEP Copolymers
    • 4.10. Conformations and Transitions of Perfluoroalkoxy Polymer
    • 4.11. Conformations and Transitions of Polyvinylidene Fluoride
    • 4.12. Conformations and Transitions of Ethylene–Tetrafluoroethylene Copolymer
    • 4.13. Conformations and Transitions of Ethylene–Chlorotrifluoroethylene Copolymer
  • 5. Operational Classification of Fluoropolymers
    • 5.1. Introduction
    • 5.2. TFE Homopolymers
    • 5.3. TFE Copolymers
    • 5.4. CTFE Polymers
    • 5.5. VDF Polymers
    • 5.6. VF Polymers
    • 5.7. Process Classification
  • 6. Preparation and Properties of Fluorinated Monomers
    • 6.1. Introduction
    • 6.2. TFE Preparation
    • 6.3. Purification of TFE
    • 6.4. Properties of TFE
    • 6.5. Synthesis of HFP
    • 6.6. Properties of HFP
    • 6.7. Synthesis of PAVEs
    • 6.8. Properties of PAVEs
    • 6.9. Synthesis of CTFE
    • 6.10. Properties of CTFE
    • 6.11. Synthesis of VDF
    • 6.12. Properties of VDF
    • 6.13. Synthesis of Vinyl Fluoride
    • 6.14. Properties of VF
  • 7. Polymerization Surfactants
    • 7.1. Introduction
    • 7.2. Perfluorooctane Sulfonate
    • 7.3. Issues with PFOS
    • 7.4. Problem with PFOA
    • 7.5. EPA Action
    • 7.6. Alternative Surfactants for Fluoropolymer Polymerization
    • 7.7. Summary
  • 8. Polymerization and Finishing Melt-Processible Fluoropolymers
    • 8.1. Introduction
    • 8.2. Polymerization Mechanism for TFE
    • 8.3. Preparation of PFA Polymers
    • 8.4. Preparation of Perfluorinated Ethylene–Propylene Copolymers
    • 8.5. End Group Stabilization
    • 8.6. Preparation of VDF Polymers
    • 8.7. Preparation of ETFE Polymers
    • 8.8. Preparation of ECTFE Polymers
    • 8.9. Preparation of VF Polymers
    • 8.10. Polymerization in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide
    • 8.11. Characterization of Fluoropolymers
  • 9. Commercial Grades of Melt-Processible Fluoropolymers
    • 9.1. Introduction
    • 9.2. Perfluoroalkoxy Polymer
    • 9.3. Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene Polymer
    • 9.4. Polyvinylidene Fluoride
    • 9.5. Ethylene Tetrafluoroethylene Polymer
    • 9.6. Ethylene Chlorotrifluoroethylene Polymer
    • 9.7. Terpolymer Fluoroplastics
    • 9.8. Polyvinyl Fluoride
    • 9.9. Fluoroplastic Films
  • 10. Injection Molding
    • 10.1. Introduction
    • 10.2. General Considerations
    • 10.3. Basic Technology
    • 10.4. The Process
    • 10.5. Injection Molding Machinery
    • 10.6. Troubleshooting
    • 10.7. Injection Molds
    • 10.8. Materials of Construction
    • 10.9. Rheology of Fluoropolymer Melts
    • 10.10. Processing of Fluoropolymers
  • 11. Extrusion
    • 11.1. Introduction
    • 11.2. Fundamentals of Extrusion Processes
    • 11.3. Fluoropolymer Wire Coating
    • 11.4. Fluoropolymer Tube Extrusion
    • 11.5. Fluoropolymer Film Extrusion
    • 11.6. Fluoropolymer Fibers
    • 11.7. Thermal Stability of Fluoropolymers
  • 12. Rotational Molding and Linings
    • 12.1. Introduction
    • 12.2. Background
    • 12.3. Basic Process Technology
    • 12.4. Rotational Molding Equipment
    • 12.5. Equipment and Process Design
    • 12.6. Operation of Rotomolding Processes
    • 12.7. Rotolining Process
    • 12.8. Rotomolding and Rotolining of Fluoropolymers
    • 12.9. Melting of Polymer and Part Formation
    • 12.10. Troubleshooting
    • 12.11. Conclusion
  • 13. Other Molding Techniques
    • 13.1. Introduction
    • 13.2. Compression Molding
    • 13.3. Transfer Molding
    • 13.4. Blow Molding
  • 14. Fluoropolymer Foams
    • 14.1. Introduction
    • 14.2. Background
    • 14.3. Foaming Technology
    • 14.4. Foam Manufacturing Processes
    • 14.5. Benefits of Fluoroplastic Foams
    • 14.6. Foaming Technology
    • 14.7. Extrusion Foaming of Melt-Processible Perfluoropolymers
    • 14.8. Summary
  • 15. Chemical Properties of Fluoropolymers
    • 15.1. Introduction
    • 15.2. Chemical Compatibility of Perfluoropolymers
    • 15.3. Chemical Compatibility of Partially Fluorinated Fluoropolymers
    • 15.4. Permeation Fundamentals
    • 15.5. Permeation Measurement and Data
    • 15.6. Environmental Stress Cracking
  • 16. Properties of Fluoropolymers
    • 16.1. Introduction
    • 16.2. Influence of Processing on Fluoroplastics
    • 16.3. Mechanical and Dynamic Properties
    • 16.4. Thermal Properties
    • 16.5. Weatherability
    • 16.6. Electrical Properties
    • 16.7. Optical and Spectral Properties
    • 16.8. Radiation Effect
    • 16.9. Flammability
    • 16.10. Biofilm Formation
  • 17. Surface Treatment of Fluoropolymers for Adhesion
    • 17.1. Introduction
    • 17.2. Sodium Etching of Fluoroplastics
    • 17.3. Plasma Treatment of Fluoropolymers and PTFE
    • 17.4. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment
    • 17.5. Corona Treatment
    • 17.6. Flame Treatment
  • 18. Fabrication of Fluoropolymers
    • 18.1. Introduction
    • 18.2. Machining
    • 18.3. Adhesive Bonding Methods
    • 18.4. Welding and Joining
    • 18.5. Heat-Sealing Films
    • 18.6. Heat Bonding
    • 18.7. Metallization
    • 18.8. Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Films
    • 18.9. Cross-Linking
    • 18.10. Thermoforming
    • 18.11. Other Processes
  • 19. Applications in Microelectronics Industry
    • 19.1. Introduction
    • 19.2. Review of Microelectronics Manufacturing
    • 19.3. Geometry Trends
    • 19.4. Use of Fluoropolymers
    • 19.5. Purity Measurement Methods and Standards
    • 19.6. Trends for the Use of Fluoropolymers in the Semiconductor Industry
  • 20. Applications of Fluoropolymers
    • 20.1. Chemical Processing
    • 20.2. Piping
    • 20.3. Vessels
    • 20.4. CPI Components
    • 20.5. Self-Supporting Components
    • 20.6. Trends in Using Fluoropolymers in Chemical Service
    • 20.7. Semiconductor Processing
    • 20.8. Electrical Applications
    • 20.9. Mechanical Applications
    • 20.10. Automotive and Aerospace
    • 20.11. Medical Devices
    • 20.12. Summary
  • 21. Safety, Health, Environmental, Disposal, and Recycling
    • 21.1. Introduction
    • 21.2. Toxicology of Fluoropolymers
    • 21.3. Thermal Properties of Fluoropolymers
    • 21.4. Emission during Processing
    • 21.5. Safety Measures
    • 21.6. Food Contact
    • 21.7. Fluoropolymer Scrap and Recycling
    • 21.8. Environmental Protection and Disposal Methods
  • Glossary
    • General
    • Semiconductor Glossary
  • Index
 
 
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