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High-temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for the 21st Century
 
 

High-temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for the 21st Century, 2nd Edition

Fundamentals, Design and Applications

 
High-temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for the 21st Century, 2nd Edition,Kevin Kendall,Michaela Kendall,ISBN9780124104532
 
 
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Academic Press

9780124104532

9780124104839

520

234 X 155

The authoritative reference on the world’s most efficient fuel cells--now updated with the cutting-edge breakthroughs that will finally push this green energy source into the mainstream

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Key Features

  • A single source for all the latest information on solid oxide fuel cells and their applications
  • Illustrates the need for new, more comprehensive books and study on the topic
  • Explores the growing interest in fuel cells as viable, sustainable sources of energy

Description

High-temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, Second Edition, explores the growing interest in fuel cells as a sustainable source of energy. The text brings the topic of green energy front and center, illustrating the need for new books that provide comprehensive and practical information on specific types of fuel cells and their applications. This landmark volume on solid oxide fuel cells contains contributions from experts of international repute, and provides a single source of the latest knowledge on this topic.

Readership

Designers, manufacturers and end-users of solid oxide and other fuel cells: researchers in fuel cell technology; membrane manufacturers.

Kevin Kendall

Professor Kendall was elected Fellow of the Royal Society in 1993, following more than two decades of advancing research in fuel cells and materials. Previously, he has worked at the University of Keele and Akron University, and has worked in research at Joseph Lucas, British Railways and ICI. Professor Kendall is especially noted in the USA where his patents on microtubular SOFCs have been exploited by two companies (Acumentrics and Nanodynamics) which have since received about 30M$ of funding for product development. He is also the founder and chief of the Birmingham start-up company. Adelan which specializes in SOFC technology. He received the Award for Excellence of the American Adhesion Society in 1999, one of only three Britons ever to achieve this, and was awarded the Wake medal for adhesion in 2005. He is Fellow of the Royal Society, Fellow of the Institute of Physics, Member of the Institute of Materials, Editorial board member for J Adhesion & Adhesives, member of the Hooke Committee of Royal Society and is Secretary of the Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Centre. His research specializations include fuel cell science and technology, especially for domestic houses, and Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). He runs the major SOFC conference in the UK and is also on the Grove and Fuel Cell Forum conference committees. His current research projects include; collaboration with Adelan Ltd on fuel cell development, the REALSOFC European project, collaboration with Shell on fuel reforming and a project with Baxi on implementation of fuel cell systems in domestic houses.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, UK

Michaela Kendall

Affiliations and Expertise

Dr Michaela Kendall School of Metallurgy and Materials University of Birmingham

High-temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for the 21st Century, 2nd Edition

  • 1: Introduction to SOFCs
    • Abstract
    • 1.1 Introduction
    • 1.2 SOFC principles
    • 1.3 Problems to be resolved
    • 1.4 Historical summary
    • 1.5 Zirconia sensors for oxygen measurement
    • 1.6 Zirconia availability and production
    • 1.7 High-quality electrolyte fabrication processes
    • 1.8 Anode-supported SOFC materials and reactions
    • 1.9 Interconnection for electrically connecting the cells
    • 1.10 Cell and stack designs
    • 1.11 SOFC reactor systems
    • 1.12 Fuel considerations
    • 1.13 Competition and combination with heat engines in applications
    • 1.14 SOFC publications
  • 2: History
    • Abstract
    • 2.1 Introduction
    • 2.2 Before the first solid electrolyte gas cells
    • 2.3 From solid electrolyte gas cells to solid oxide fuel cells
    • 2.4 First detailed investigations of solid oxide fuel cells
    • 2.5 Progress in the 1960s
    • 2.6 On the path to practical solid oxide fuel cells
    • 2.7 Ceramic processing for high-quality products
    • 2.8 Anode support
    • 2.9 Better cathodes
    • 2.10 Low-temperature operation with new interconnects
    • 2.11 Application areas
    • 2.12 Summary
  • 3: Thermodynamics
    • Abstract
    • 3.1 Introduction
    • 3.2 The ideal reversible SOFC
    • 3.3 Ohmic losses and voltage dependence on fuel utilisation
    • 3.4 Thermodynamic definition of a fuel cell producing electricity and heat
    • 3.5 Thermodynamic theory of hybrid SOFC systems
    • 3.6 Design principles of SOFC hybrid systems
    • 3.7 Summary
  • 4: Electrolytes
    • Abstract
    • 4.1 Introduction
    • 4.2 Fluorite-structured electrolytes
    • 4.3 Perovskite and perovskite-related electrolytes
    • 4.4 Alternative-structured electrolyte materials
    • 4.5 Summary
  • 5: Anodes
    • Abstract
    • 5.1 Introduction
    • 5.2 Cell performance requirements
    • 5.3 Cell lifetime requirements
    • 5.4 Catalytic and reforming properties
    • 5.5 Anode design and engineering
    • 5.6 Conventional nickel-based anodes
    • 5.7 Alternative cermet materials
    • 5.8 General conclusions
  • 6: Cathodes
    • 6.1 Introduction
    • 6.2 Physical and physicochemical properties of perovskite cathode materials
    • 6.3 Chemical stability and compatibility with the cell components
    • 6.4 Thermo-chemo-mechanical properties
    • 6.5 Summary and further researches
  • 7: Interconnects
    • Abstract
    • 7.1 Introduction
    • 7.2 SOFC environments
    • 7.3 Ceramic interconnects
    • 7.4 High-temperature alloys for SOFC applications
    • 7.5 Growth rates of chromia base surface scales
    • 7.6 Degradation in carbon containing anode gases
    • 7.7 Dual atmosphere exposures
    • 7.8 Specimens thickness dependence of oxidation behaviour
    • 7.9 Electronic conductivity of chromia-based scales
    • 7.10 Volatile species and protection against chromium evaporation
    • 7.11 Interaction between interconnect and anode side contact materials
    • 7.12 Interaction of metallic interconnects with sealing materials
    • 7.13 Protective coatings and contact materials
    • 7.14 Summary
  • 8: Cell and stack design, fabrication and performance
    • Abstract
    • 8.1 Introduction
    • 8.2 Requirements
    • 8.3 SOFC single cell
    • 8.4 SOFC multi-cell stacks
    • 8.5 Summarising remarks
  • 9: System designs and applications
    • Abstract
    • 9.1 Introduction
    • 9.2 Overview of SOFC power systems
    • 9.3 Type of SOFC power system
    • 9.4 SOFC power system design
    • 9.5 Applications of SOFC power systems
    • 9.6 Solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) systems for hydrogen/chemical production
    • 9.7 Summarising remarks
  • 10: Portable early market SOFCs
    • Abstract
    • 10.1 Introduction
    • 10.2 Sensor SOFCs
    • 10.3 MEMS-based SOFCs
    • 10.4 Micro-tubular SOFCs
    • 10.5 Benefit of improved ceramic processing for quality ceramics
    • 10.6 Benefits of improved power density
    • 10.7 Rapid warm-up
    • 10.8 International efforts on micro SOFCs
    • 10.9 Demonstration projects
    • 10.10 Summary
  • 11: Sources of cell and electrode polarisation losses in SOFCs
    • Abstract
    • 11.1 Introduction
    • 11.2 Cell losses
    • 11.3 Ohmic and gas-phase losses within porous electrodes
    • 11.4 Cell losses within a multi-cell stack
    • 11.5 Subdivision of local overpotential into specific rate processes
    • 11.6 Conclusions and outlook
  • 12: Testing of electrodes, cells and short stacks
    • Abstract
    • 12.1 Introduction
    • 12.2 Testing electrodes
    • 12.3 Testing single cells and stacks
    • 12.4 Area-specific resistance
    • 12.5 Testing cells on alternative fuels
    • 12.6 Summary
  • 13: Cell, stack and system modelling
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgements
    • 13.1 Introduction
    • 13.2 Basic definitions
    • 13.3 Multi-scale modelling
    • 13.4 System level modelling
    • 13.5 Oscillations in SOFCs running on methane
    • 13.6 Summary and future prospect
  • 14: Fuels and fuel processing in SOFC applications
    • Abstract
    • 14.1 Introduction
    • 14.2 Range of fuels
    • 14.3 Fuel reforming principle
    • 14.4 Carbon deposition and removal
    • 14.5 Impurity tolerance and purification
    • 14.6 Application of typical reforming processes for SOFCs
    • 14.7 Brief consideration of present technology and future prospect
  • Quotes and reviews

    "The book says that solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are the most efficient devices yet invented for conversion of chemical fuels directly into electrical power. It points out that improvements in theory and experiment are still being made 120 years after the original work on fuel cells."--Power Electronics, High-temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for the 21st Century, 2nd Edition

    "The information contained in most of the chapters is fundamental enough for the book to be useful as a textbook for students at graduate level....Scientists and researchers already active in the field will also find the book very interesting. "- Paola Costamagna, DICHEP - University of Genova, Italy

     
     
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