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Nanotechnology Applications for Clean Water
 
 

Nanotechnology Applications for Clean Water, 2nd Edition

Solutions for Improving Water Quality

 
Nanotechnology Applications for Clean Water, 2nd Edition,Anita Street,Richard Sustich,Jeremiah Duncan,Nora Savage,ISBN9781455731169
 
 
 

Street   &   Sustich   &   Duncan   &   Savage   

William Andrew

9781455731169

9781455731855

704

235 X 191

Brings together the current technologies and future possibilities for reaching universal access to clean water

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Key Features

  • Addresses both the technological aspects of delivering clean water supplies and the societal implications that affect take-up
  • Details how the technologies are applied in large-scale water treatment plants and in point-of-use systems
  • Highlights challenges and the opportunities for nanotechnology to positively influence this area of environmental protection

Description

Nanotechnology is already having a dramatic impact on improving water quality and the second edition of Nanotechnology Applications for Clean Water highlights both the challenges and the opportunities for nanotechnology to positively influence this area of environmental protection. This book presents detailed information on cutting-edge technologies, current research, and trends that may impact the success and uptake of the applications.

Recent advances show that many of the current problems with water quality can be addressed using nanosorbents, nanocatalysts, bioactive nanoparticles, nanostructured catalytic membranes, and nanoparticle enhanced filtration. The book describes these technologies in detail and demonstrates how they can provide clean drinking water in both large scale water treatment plants and in point-of-use systems. In addition, the book addresses the societal factors that may affect widespread acceptance of the applications.

Sections are also featured on carbon nanotube arrays and graphene-based sensors for contaminant sensing, nanostructured membranes for water purification, and multifunctional materials in carbon microspheres for the remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons.

Readership

Engineers, researchers, students of water quality, water and wastewater management, groundwater remediation and pollution prevention. Policy and government officials.

Anita Street

Affiliations and Expertise

United States Department of Energy

Richard Sustich

Affiliations and Expertise

US Water Alliance

Jeremiah Duncan

Affiliations and Expertise

Plymouth State University

Nora Savage

Affiliations and Expertise

United States Environmental Protection Agency

Nanotechnology Applications for Clean Water, 2nd Edition

  • List of Contributors
  • Foreword
  • Preface
    • Introduction
    • Disclaimer
  • Acknowledgment
  • Introduction: Water Purification in the Twenty-First Century—Challenges and Opportunities
    • I.1 Current water issues
    • I.2 Water purification: impacts and opportunities
    • I.3 Critical problems to be addressed in water research
    • I.4 Conclusion
    • References
  • Part 1: Contaminant Sensing Technologies
    • Chapter 1. Sensors Based on Carbon Nanotube Arrays and Graphene for Water Monitoring
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 CNT-based electrochemical sensors
      • 1.3 Graphene-based sensors
      • 1.4 Conclusions and future work
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 2. Advanced Nanosensors for Environmental Monitoring
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Nanostructured sensing materials developed
      • 2.3 Chemical sensor arrays and pattern recognition
      • 2.4 Biosensing applications of nanostructured materials
      • 2.5 Conclusions and future perspectives
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 3. Electrochemical Biosensors Based on Nanomaterials for Detection of Pesticides and Explosives
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Nanomaterials-based biosensors for pesticides
      • 3.3 NP-based electrochemical immunoassay of TNT
      • 3.4 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 4. Dye Nanoparticle-Coated Test Strips for Detection of ppb-Level Ions in Water
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Fundamental concept of dye nanoparticle-coated test strip
      • 4.3 The strategy to produce a suitable DNTS for a target ion
      • 4.4 Detection of harmful ions in water with DNTSs
      • 4.5 Conclusions and future perspectives
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 5. Functional Nucleic Acid-Directed Assembly of Nanomaterials and Their Applications as Colorimetric and Fluorescent Sensors for Trace Contaminants in Water
      • 5.1 Detection of trace contaminants in water
      • 5.2 Functional nucleic acids for molecular recognition
      • 5.3 Functional nucleic acid-directed assembly of nanomaterials for sensing contaminants
      • 5.4 Simultaneous multiplexed detection using quantum dots and gold nanoparticles
      • 5.5 Sensors on solid supports
      • 5.6 Other sensing schemes utilizing electrochemistry and magnetic resonance imaging
      • 5.7 Conclusions and future perspective
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
  • Part 2: Separation Technologies
    • Chapter 6. Nanostructured Membranes for Water Purification
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Conducting PAA membranes
      • 6.3 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 7. Advances in Nanostructured Membranes for Water Desalination
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Desalination technologies
      • 7.3 Nanostructured membranes
      • 7.4 Application of nanostructured membranes
      • 7.5 Commercial efforts to date
      • 7.6 Future challenge of energy-efficient CNT membranes for desalination
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 8. Nanostructured Titanium Oxide Film- and Membrane-Based Photocatalysis for Water Treatment
      • 8.1 TiO2 photocatalysis and challenges
      • 8.2 Sol–gel synthesis of porous TiO2: surfactant self-assembling
      • 8.3 Immobilization of TiO2 in the form of films and membranes
      • 8.4 Activation of TiO2 under visible light irradiation
      • 8.5 Selective decomposition of target contaminants
      • 8.6 Versatile environmental applications
      • 8.7 Suggestions and implications
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 9. Nanotechnology-Based Membranes for Water Purification
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Zeolite-coated ceramic membranes
      • 9.3 Inorganic–organic TFN membranes
      • 9.4 Hybrid protein–polymer biomimetic membranes
      • 9.5 Aligned CNT membranes
      • 9.6 Self-assembled block copolymer membranes
      • 9.7 Graphene-based membranes
      • 9.8 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 10. Multifunctional Nanomaterial-Enabled Membranes for Water Treatment
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Nanostructured membranes with functional nanoparticles
      • 10.3 Potential future research directions
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 11. Nanofluidic Carbon Nanotube Membranes: Applications for Water Purification and Desalination
      • 11.1 Introduction: carbon nanotube membrane technology for water purification
      • 11.2 Basic structure and properties of carbon nanotubes
      • 11.3 Water transport in carbon nanotube pores: an MD simulation view
      • 11.4 Fabrication of carbon nanotube membranes
      • 11.5 Experimental observations of water transport in double-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotube membranes
      • 11.6 Nanofiltration properties of carbon nanotube membranes
      • 11.7 Altering transport selectivity by membrane functionalization
      • 11.8 Is energy-efficient desalination and water purification with carbon nanotube membranes possible and practical?
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 12. Design of Advanced Membranes and Substrates for Water Purification and Desalination
      • 12.1 Overview
      • 12.2 Novel method to make a continuous micro-mesopore membrane with tailored surface chemistry for use in nanofiltration
      • 12.3 Deposition of polyelectrolyte complex films under pressure and from organic solvents
      • 12.4 Solvent resistant hydrolyzed polyacrylonitrile membranes
      • 12.5 Polyimides membranes for nanofiltration
      • 12.6 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 13. Customization and Multistage Nanofiltration Applications for Potable Water, Treatment, and Reuse
      • 13.1 Potable water
      • 13.2 Water treatment and reuse
      • Reference
    • Chapter 14. Commercialization of Nanotechnology for Removal of Heavy Metals in Drinking Water
      • 14.1 Issues that need to be addressed
      • 14.2 General approaches
      • 14.3 Specific technology used by CCT and results
      • 14.4 Moving technology to the next phase
      • References
    • Chapter 15. Water Treatment by Dendrimer-Enhanced Filtration: Principles and Applications
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Dendrimers as recyclable ligands for cations
      • 15.3 Dendrimers as recyclable ligands for anions
      • 15.4 Dendrimer-enhanced filtration: overview and applications
      • 15.5 Summary and outlook
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 16. Detection and Extraction of Pesticides from Drinking Water Using Nanotechnologies
      • 16.1 Introduction
      • 16.2 The need for nanomaterials and nanotechnology
      • 16.3 Earlier efforts for pesticide removal
      • 16.4 Nanomaterials-based chemistry: recent approaches
      • 16.5 Pesticide removal from drinking water: a case study
      • 16.6 Future directions
      • 16.7 Summary
      • References
      • Further Reading
    • Chapter 17. Nanomaterials-Enhanced Electrically Switched Ion Exchange Process for Water Treatment
      • 17.1 Introduction
      • 17.2 Principle of the electrically switched ion exchange technology
      • 17.3 Nanomaterials-enhanced electrically switched ion exchange for removal of radioactive cesium-137
      • 17.4 Nanomaterials-enhanced electrically switched ion exchange for removal of chromate and perchlorate
      • 17.5 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
  • Part 3: Transformation Technologies
    • Chapter 18. Nanometallic Particles for Oligodynamic Microbial Disinfection
      • 18.1 Introduction
      • 18.2 Economic impact of modern disinfection systems
      • 18.3 Health impact of water disinfection shortfalls
      • 18.4 Modern disinfection systems
      • 18.5 Nanometallic particles in alternative disinfection systems
      • 18.6 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 19. Nanostructured Visible-Light Photocatalysts for Water Purification
      • 19.1 Visible-light photocatalysis with titanium oxides
      • 19.2 Sol–gel fabrication of nitrogen-doped titanium oxide nanoparticle photocatalysts
      • 19.3 Metal-ion-modified nitrogen-doped titanium oxide photocatalysts
      • 19.4 Nanostructured nitrogen-doped titanium-oxide-based photocatalysts
      • 19.5 Environmental properties of nitrogen-doped titanium-oxide-based photocatalysts
      • 19.6 Conclusions and future directions
      • References
    • Chapter 20. Nanotechnology-Enabled Water Disinfection and Microbial Control: Merits and Limitations
      • 20.1 Introduction
      • 20.2 Current and potential applications
      • 20.3 Outlook on the role of nanotechnology in microbial control: limitations and research needs
      • References
    • Chapter 21. Possible Applications of Fullerene Nanomaterials in Water Treatment and Reuse
      • 21.1 Introduction
      • 21.2 Chemistry of fullerene nanomaterials
      • 21.3 Applications of fullerene nanomaterials
      • 21.4 Summary
      • Acknowledgements
      • References
    • Chapter 22. Heterogeneous Catalytic Reduction for Water Purification: Nanoscale Effects on Catalytic Activity, Selectivity, and Sustainability
      • 22.1 Introduction
      • 22.2 Catalytic hydrodehalogenation: iodinated X-ray contrast media
      • 22.3 Selective catalytic nitrate reduction
      • 22.4 Conclusions and prospects
      • References
    • Chapter 23. Enhanced Dechlorination of Trichloroethylene by Membrane-Supported Iron and Bimetallic Nanoparticles
      • 23.1 Introduction
      • 23.2 Nanoparticle formation
      • 23.3 Polymers
      • 23.4 Composite material
      • 23.5 Water treatment
      • 23.6 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 24. Synthesis of Nanostructured Bimetallic Particles in Polyligand-Functionalized Membranes for Remediation Applications
      • 24.1 Introduction
      • 24.2 Nanoparticle synthesis in functionalized membranes
      • 24.3 Characterization of polyacrylic acid functionalized membranes
      • 24.4 Characterization of nanoparticles in membranes
      • 24.5 Reactivity of membrane-based nanoparticles
      • 24.6 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 25. Magnesium-Based Corrosion Nano-Cells for Reductive Transformation of Contaminants
      • 25.1 Introduction
      • 25.2 Magnesium-based bimetallic systems
      • 25.3 Unique corrosion properties of magnesium
      • 25.4 Doping nanoscale palladium onto magnesium—modified alcohol reduction route
      • 25.5 Role of nanosynthesis in assuaging concerns from palladium usage
      • 25.6 Challenges in nanoscaling magnesium
      • 25.7 Other environmental applications
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
  • Part 4: Stabilization Technologies
    • Chapter 26. Multifunctional Materials Containing Nanoscale Zerovalent Iron in Carbon Microspheres for the Environmentally Benign Remediation of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons
      • 26.1 Introduction
      • 26.2 Materials synthesis
      • 26.3 Stability and transport characteristics
      • 26.4 Partitioning at TCE–water interfaces
      • 26.5 Summary
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 27. Water Decontamination Using Iron and Iron Oxide Nanoparticles
      • 27.1 Introduction
      • 27.2 Synthesis and properties of iron and iron oxide nanoparticles
      • 27.3 Removal of pollutants through sorption/dechlorination by iron/iron oxide nanoparticles
      • 27.4 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 28. Nanotechnology for Contaminated Subsurface Remediation: Possibilities and Challenges
      • 28.1 Introduction
      • 28.2 Sources of groundwater contamination and remediation costs
      • 28.3 Remediation alternatives
      • 28.4 Contaminated site remediation via reactive nanomaterials
      • 28.5 Example of contaminated site remediation via reactive nanometals
      • 28.6 Summary
      • References
    • Chapter 29. Green Remediation of Hexavalent Chromium Using Naturally Derived Flavonoids and Engineered Nanoparticles
      • 29.1 Introduction
      • 29.2 Nanotechnologies for site remediation and wastewater treatment
      • 29.3 Naturally occurring flavonoids as reducing agents for hexavalent chromium
      • 29.4 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 30. Physicochemistry of Polyelectrolyte Coatings that Increase Stability, Mobility, and Contaminant Specificity of Reactive Nanoparticles Used for Groundwater Remediation
      • 30.1 Challenges of using reactive nanomaterials for in situ groundwater remediation
      • 30.2 Polymeric surface modification/functionalization
      • 30.3 Effect of surface modifiers on the mobility of nanomaterials in the subsurface
      • 30.4 Contaminant targeting of polymeric functionalized nanoparticles
      • 30.5 Effect of surface modification/functionalization on contaminant degradation
      • 30.6 Remaining challenges and ongoing research and development opportunities
      • References
    • Chapter 31. Stabilization of Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles for Enhanced In Situ Destruction of Chlorinated Solvents in Soils and Groundwater
      • 31.1 Introduction
      • 31.2 Stabilization of zero-valent iron nanoparticles using polysaccharides
      • 31.3 Reactivity of starch- or carboxymethyl-cellulose-stabilized zero-valent iron nanoparticles
      • References
    • Chapter 32. Reducing Leachability and Bioaccessibility of Toxic Metals in Soils, Sediments, and Solid/Hazardous Wastes Using Stabilized Nanoparticles
      • 32.1 Reductive immobilization of chromate in soil and water using stabilized zero-valent iron nanoparticles
      • 32.2 In situ immobilization of lead in soils using stabilized vivianite nanoparticles
      • 32.3 Mechanisms of nanoparticle stabilization by carboxymethyl cellulose
      • 32.4 Conclusions
      • References
  • Part 5: Societal Issues
    • Chapter 33. Introduction to Societal Issues: The Responsible Development of Nanotechnology for Water
      • References
    • Chapter 34. Nanotechnology in Water: Societal, Ethical, and Environmental Considerations
      • 34.1 Introduction
      • 34.2 Responsible development: ethical, social, and environmental concerns
      • 34.3 Public engagement: what role should the public have?
      • 34.4 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 35. Competition for Water
      • 35.1 Introduction
      • 35.2 Population and technological impacts on water
      • 35.3 Water access
      • 35.4 Corruption, mismanagement, and overconsumption
      • 35.5 Climate change and global warming
      • 35.6 Patents: parity and access issues
      • 35.7 Political demands
      • 35.8 Conflict
      • 35.9 Biofuels
      • 35.10 Bottled water
      • 35.11 Future trends
      • 35.12 Conclusions
      • Notes
      • References
    • Chapter 36. A Framework for Using Nanotechnology to Improve Water Quality
      • 36.1 Introduction
      • 36.2 Superordinate goals
      • 36.3 Trading zones
      • 36.4 Moral imagination
      • 36.5 Adaptive management
      • 36.6 Anticipatory governance
      • 36.7 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 37. International Governance Perspectives on Nanotechnology Water Innovation
      • 37.1 Introduction
      • 37.2 Diagnosing the need
      • 37.3 The role for policy
      • 37.4 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 38. Nanoscience and Water: Public Engagement at and Below the Surface
      • 38.1 Introduction
      • 38.2 Water and the public
      • 38.3 Nanotechnology treatment strategies
      • 38.4 Modalities
      • 38.5 Water and public engagement
      • 38.6 Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
      • Notes
      • References
    • Chapter 39. How Can Nanotechnologies Fulfill the Needs of Developing Countries?
      • 39.1 Nanotechnologies and developing countries
      • 39.2 How can nanotechnologies deliver public value?
      • 39.3 Nanodialogues in Zimbabwe
      • 39.4 Balancing risk and opportunity
      • 39.5 Future directions
      • References
    • Chapter 40. Challenges to Implementing Nanotechnology Solutions to Water Issues in Africa
      • 40.1 Introduction
      • 40.2 Community involvement or ownership
      • 40.3 Community need for the technology
      • 40.4 Community water quality monitoring
      • 40.5 Infrastructure
      • 40.6 Capacity development
      • 40.7 Improvements in quality of life
      • 40.8 Commercialization of nanotechnologies
      • 40.9 Conclusions
      • References
    • Chapter 41. Life Cycle Inventory of Semiconductor Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots for Environmental Applications
      • 41.1 Introduction
      • 41.2 Applications and synthesis of quantum dots
      • 41.3 Methodology
      • 41.4 Life cycle inventory of synthesis of CdSe quantum dots
      • 41.5 Conclusions and future perspective
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
  • Part 6: Outlook
    • Nanotechnology Solutions for Improving Water Quality
    • Index
 
 
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