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The Multibody Systems Approach to Vehicle Dynamics
 
 

The Multibody Systems Approach to Vehicle Dynamics, 2nd Edition

 
The Multibody Systems Approach to Vehicle Dynamics, 2nd Edition,Michael Blundell,Damian Harty,ISBN9780080994253
 
 
 

  &      

Butterworth-Heinemann

9780080994253

9780080994284

768

235 X 191

Dedicated guide to the application of multibody systems analysis (MBS) to vehicle dynamics modeling and simulation

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Key Features

  • Unique gelling of foundational theory, research findings, practical insights, and multibody systems modeling know-how, reflecting the mixed academic and industrial experience of this expert author team
  • Coverage of the latest models, safety developments, simulation methods, and features bring the new edition up to date with advances in this critical and evolving field

Description

Filling the gaps between subjective vehicle assessment, classical vehicle dynamics and computer-based multibody approaches, The Multibody Systems Approach to Vehicle Dynamics offers unique coverage of both the virtual and practical aspects of vehicle dynamics from concept design to system analysis and handling development.

The book provides valuable foundation knowledge of vehicle dynamics as well as drawing on laboratory studies, test-track work, and finished vehicle applications to gel theory with practical examples and observations. Combined with insights into the capabilities and limitations of multibody simulation, this comprehensive mix provides the background understanding, practical reality and simulation know-how needed to make and interpret useful models.

New to this edition you will find coverage of the latest tire models, changes to the modeling of light commercial vehicles, developments in active safety systems, torque vectoring, and examples in AView, as well as updates to theory, simulation, and modeling techniques throughout.

Readership

Practicing engineers, graduate students and researchers working in vehicle dynamics modeling and simulation, including vehicle design engineers and those involved in modeling, specification and analysis of suspension, steering, braking and tires.

Michael Blundell

Mike Blundell is Professor of Vehicle Dynamics and Impact, Mechanical & Automotive Engineering, Coventry University, UK. He specializes in vehicle dynamics and safety teaching and research, and has worked with multibody systems applications in vehicle dynamics in industry and academia, publishing many papers on the topic.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Coventry, UK

Damian Harty

Damian Harty is a Senior Staff Engineer at Polaris Industries based in Minnesota. He was formerly Director of the Vehicle & System Dynamics Group at Coventry University, a Technical Specialist for vehicle dynamics with Prodrive on the Mini WRC, as well as a freelance consultant.

Affiliations and Expertise

Senior Staff Engineer at Polaris Industries, Minnesota, USA.

The Multibody Systems Approach to Vehicle Dynamics, 2nd Edition

  • Preface
  • Acknowledgements
  • Nomenclature
  • Chapter 1. Introduction
    • 1.1. Overview
    • 1.2. What is vehicle dynamics?
    • 1.3. Why analyse?
    • 1.4. Classical methods
    • 1.5. Analytical process
    • 1.6. Computational methods
    • 1.7. Computer-based tools
    • 1.8. Commercial computer packages
    • 1.9. Benchmarking exercises
  • Chapter 2. Kinematics and Dynamics of Rigid Bodies
    • 2.1. Introduction
    • 2.2. Theory of vectors
    • 2.3. Geometry analysis
    • 2.4. Velocity analysis
    • 2.5. Acceleration analysis
    • 2.6. Static force and moment definition
    • 2.7. Dynamics of a particle
    • 2.8. Linear momentum of a rigid body
    • 2.9. Angular momentum
    • 2.10. Moments of inertia
    • 2.11. Parallel axes theorem
    • 2.12. Principal axes
    • 2.13. Equations of motion
  • Chapter 3. Multibody Systems Simulation Software
    • 3.1. Overview
    • 3.2. Modelling features
    • 3.3. Analysis capabilities
    • 3.4. Eigensolutions
    • 3.5. Systems of units
    • 3.6. Further comments on pre- and postprocessing
  • Chapter 4. Modelling and Analysis of Suspension Systems
    • 4.1. The need for suspension
    • 4.2. Types of suspension system
    • 4.3. Quarter vehicle modelling approaches
    • 4.4. Determination of suspension system characteristics
    • 4.5. Suspension calculations
    • 4.6. The compliance matrix approach
    • 4.7. Case study 1 – suspension kinematics
    • 4.8. Durability studies (component loading)
    • 4.9. Ride studies (body isolation)
    • 4.10. Case study 5 – suspension vector analysis comparison with MBS
  • Chapter 5. Tyre Characteristics and Modelling
    • 5.1. Introduction
    • 5.2. Tyre axis frames and geometry
    • 5.3. The tyre contact patch
    • 5.4. Tyre force and moment characteristics
    • 5.5. Experimental testing
    • 5.6. Tyre Modelling
    • 5.7. Implementation with MBS
    • 5.8. Examples of tyre model data
    • 5.9. Case study 6 – comparison of vehicle handling tyre models
  • Chapter 6. Modelling and Assembly of the Full Vehicle
    • 6.1. Introduction
    • 6.2. The vehicle body
    • 6.3. Measured outputs
    • 6.4. Suspension system representation
    • 6.5. Modelling of springs and dampers
    • 6.6. Anti-roll bars
    • 6.7. Determination of roll stiffness for the equivalent roll stiffness model
    • 6.8. Aerodynamic effects
    • 6.9. Modelling of vehicle braking
    • 6.10. Modelling traction
    • 6.11. Other driveline components
    • 6.12. The steering system
    • 6.13. Driver behaviour
    • 6.14. Case study 7 – trajectory preparation for a NATO lane change
    • 6.15. Case study 8 – comparison of full vehicle handling models
    • 6.16. Summary
  • Chapter 7. Simulation Output and Interpretation
    • 7.1. Introduction
    • 7.2. Case study 9 – variation in measured data
    • 7.3. A vehicle dynamics overview
    • 7.4. Transient effects
    • 7.5. Steering feel as a subjective modifier
    • 7.6. Roll as an objective and subjective modifier
    • 7.7. Frequency response
    • 7.8. The problems imposed by …
    • 7.9. The use of analytical models with a signal-to-noise approach
    • 7.10. Some consequences of using SN ratio
  • Chapter 8. Active Systems
    • 8.1. Introduction
    • 8.2. Active systems
    • 8.3. Which active system?
  • Appendix A. Vehicle Model System Schematics and Data Sets
  • Appendix B. Fortran Tyre Model Subroutines
    • B.1. Interpolation tyre model subroutine
    • B.2. Magic formula tyre model (version 3) subroutine
    • B.3. The Harty tyre model subroutine
  • Appendix C. Glossary of Terms
  • Appendix D. Standards for Proving Ground Tests
  • References
  • Index
 
 
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