Physical Metallurgy, 5th Edition

 
Physical Metallurgy, 5th Edition,David Laughlin,Kazuhiro Hono,ISBN9780444537706
 
 
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Laughlin   &   Hono   

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9780444537706

9780444537713

2960

246 X 189

This fifth edition retains the prior edition's status as the standard reference work in physical metallurgy.

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Key Features

  • Exhaustively synthesizes the pertinent, contemporary developments within physical metallurgy so scientists have authoritative information at their fingertips
  • Replaces existing articles and monographs with a single, complete solution
  • Enables metallurgists to predict changes and create novel alloys and processes

Description

This fifth edition of the highly regarded family of titles that first published in 1965 is now a three-volume set and over 3,000 pages. All chapters have been revised and expanded, either by the fourth edition authors alone or jointly with new co-authors. Chapters have been added on the physical metallurgy of light alloys, the physical metallurgy of titanium alloys, atom probe field ion microscopy, computational metallurgy, and orientational imaging microscopy. The books incorporate the latest experimental research results and theoretical insights. Several thousand citations to the research and review literature are included.

Readership

For teaching and research faculty, upper level undergraduate students, graduate students, and post-doctoral research associates in metallurgy and materials science and technology and related areas of study (physics, chemistry and biomedical science).

David Laughlin

David E. Laughlin is the ALCOA Professor of Physical Metallurgy in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, where he has taught since 1974. He also holds a courtesy appointment in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at CMU.He is the Principal Editor of the Metallurgical and Materials Transactions family of journals of ASM International and TMS. His research has centered on the investigation of the structure of materials by means of transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. He has studied various diffusional phase transformations by detailed analysis of their micro-structure as well as electron diffraction patterns. For the past 25 years he has focused on the investigation of the magnetic properties and microstructure of soft magnets (HITPERM), hard magnets (FePt and CoPt) and magnetic thin films for recording media. He co-chairs the Data Storage Systems Center Magnetic Recording Group. He has taught courses on physical metallurgy, electron microscopy, diffraction techniques, thermodynamics, crystallography, magnetic materials and phase transformations. He is a director of both the X-ray Central Facility and the Electron Optics Central Facility of the Materials Science and Engineering Department of Carnegie Mellon University. He has more than 400 technical publications in the field of phase transformations, physical metallurgy and magnetic materials, and has edited or co-edited eight books and has ten U.S. Patents in the field of magnetic recording. He was elected as an Honorary member of the AIME and is a Fellow of ASM and TMS.

Affiliations and Expertise

Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Kazuhiro Hono

Kazuhiro Hono is NIMS Fellow, Director of Magnetic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Japan

Affiliations and Expertise

National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Japan

Physical Metallurgy, 5th Edition

  • List of Contributors to Volume I
  • List of Contributors to Volume II
  • List of Contributors to Volume III
  • Preface to the Fifth Edition
  • Preface to the Fourth Edition
  • Preface to the Third Edition
  • Preface to the First and Second Editions
  • About the Editors
  • Volume I
    • 1. Crystal Structures of Metallic Elements and Compounds
      • 1.1. Introduction
      • 1.2. Factors Governing Formation and Stability of Crystal Structures
      • 1.3. Crystal Structures of the Metallic Elements
      • 1.4. Crystal Structures of Intermetallic Phases
      • 1.5. Crystal Structures of Quasicrystals
    • 2. Electron Theory of Complex Metallic Alloys
      • 2.1. Introduction
      • 2.2. Fundamentals in Alloy Phase Stability
      • 2.3. Structure of Complex Metallic Alloys
      • 2.4. Electron Theory of Complex Metallic Alloys
      • 2.5. Stabilization Mechanism in a Series of Gamma-Brasses
      • 2.6. Stabilization Mechanism in 1/1–1/1–1/1 Approximants
      • 2.7. Hume-Rothery Electron Concentration Rule
    • 3. Thermodynamics and Phase Diagrams
      • 3.1. Introduction
      • 3.2. Thermodynamics
      • 3.3. The Gibbs Phase Rule
      • 3.4. Thermodynamic Origin of Binary Phase Diagrams
      • 3.5. Binary Temperature-Composition Phase Diagrams
      • 3.6. Ternary Temperature-Composition Phase Diagrams
      • 3.7. General Phase Diagram Sections
      • 3.8. Thermodynamic Databases for the Computer Calculation of Phase Diagrams
      • 3.9. Equilibrium and Nonequilibrium Solidification
      • 3.10. Second-Order and Higher-Order Transitions
      • 3.11. Bibliography
      • Acknowledgments
    • 4. Metallic Glasses
      • 4.1. Introduction
      • 4.2. Compositions, Thermodynamics and Kinetics
      • 4.3. Structure
      • 4.4. Structural Evolution
      • 4.5. Mechanical Properties
      • 4.6. Applications
    • 5. Diffusion in Metals and Alloys
      • 5.1. Introduction
      • 5.2. Atomistic Mechanism and Fundamental Relations of Diffusion
      • 5.3. Interdiffusion in Concentrated Alloys and Thermodynamic Driving Forces
      • 5.4. Experimental Techniques to Study Atomic Transport
      • 5.5. Elementary Diffusion Properties of Metals and Intermetallic Compounds
      • 5.6. Short Circuit Transport
      • 5.7. Diffusion in Nanometric Dimensions
    • 6. Defects in Metals
      • 6.1. Introduction
      • 6.2. Overview
      • 6.3. Experimental Techniques
      • 6.4. Point Defects in Pure Metals
      • 6.5. Statistical Thermodynamics of Point Defects
      • 6.6. Summary and Concluding Remarks
    • 7. Solidification
      • 7.1. Introduction
      • 7.2. Transport Phenomena during Solidification
      • 7.3. Thermodynamics of Solidification
      • 7.4. Nucleation
      • 7.5. Interface Kinetics
      • 7.6. Solidification of Alloys with Planar and Nearly Planar L–S Interfaces
      • 7.7. Cellular and Dendritic Solidification
      • 7.8. Polyphase Solidification
      • 7.9. Cast Structure and Fluid Flow
      • 7.10. Developing and Emerging Processes
    • 8. Diffusional Phase Transformations in the Solid State
      • 8.1. Introduction
      • 8.2. Energetics
      • 8.3. Rate Processes in Solids
      • 8.4. Classical Nucleation
      • 8.5. Diffusional Growth of Phases
      • 8.6. Precipitation from Solid Solution
      • 8.7. Crystallography and Microstructure
      • 8.8. Massive Transformation
      • 8.9. Closure
    • 9. Phase Transformations: Nondiffusive
      • 9.1. Martensitic Transformations
      • 9.2. Crystallographic Theory
      • 9.3. Martensite Morphology and Substructure
      • 9.4. Martensite–Parent Interfaces
      • 9.5. Energetics of Martensitic Transformations
      • 9.6. Crystallographically Similar Transformations
      • 9.7. Omega Phase Formation
      • 9.8. Phase Changes and Charge Density Waves
  • Volume II
    • 10. Microstructure of Metals and Alloys
      • 10.1. Introduction
      • 10.2. 3D Microstructure and Microstructural Analyses
      • 10.3. Specific Classes of Microstructures and Microstructural Evolution
      • 10.4. Concluding Remarks
    • 11. Orientation Mapping
      • 11.1. Orientation Mapping in the Scanning Electron Microscope
      • 11.2. Applicability of Orientation Mapping
      • 11.3. Orientation Mapping with X-rays
      • 11.4. Diffraction Contrast Microscopy
      • 11.5. X-ray Diffraction Microscopy in Three Dimensions
      • 11.6. Orientation Mapping in the TEM
      • Summary
    • 12. Transmission Electron Microscopy for Physical Metallurgists
      • 12.1. Introduction
      • 12.2. Electron Diffraction in the (S)TEM
      • 12.3. Imaging in Transmission Electron Microscopy
      • 12.4. Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (EELS)
      • 12.5. X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (XEDS) in a (S)TEM
    • 13. X-ray and Neutron Scattering
      • 13.1. Introduction
      • 13.2. Scattering from Real Crystals
      • 13.3. Bragg Peaks and Vicinity
      • 13.4. Between Bragg Peaks
      • 13.5. Near the Incident Beam
      • 13.6. Energy Transfers
    • 14. Structure, Composition and Energy of Solid–Solid Interfaces
      • 14.1. Introduction
      • 14.2. Structure and Composition of Homophase Interfaces
      • 14.3. Structure and Composition of Heterophase Interfaces
    • 15. Atom-Probe Field Ion Microscopy
      • 15.1. Introduction
      • 15.2. Overview of the Atom Probe Technique
      • 15.3. Scope of Atom-Probe Field-Ion Microscopy Technique
      • 15.4. Specific Applications to Materials
      • 15.5. Future Directions
    • 16. Dislocations
      • 16.1. Introduction
      • 16.2. Plastic Deformation and Dislocations
      • 16.3. Elasticity Associated with Dislocations
      • 16.4. Models of Dislocation Cores
      • 16.5. Planar Dislocation Cores: Case of FCC Dislocations
      • 16.6. High-Peierls Stress Dislocations: Case of BCC Screw Dislocations
      • Appendix 1.
    • 17. Plastic Deformation of Metals and Alloys
      • 17.1. Introduction
      • 17.2. Plastic Deformation Processes
      • 17.3. Role of Dislocations in Plastic Deformation
      • 17.4. Experimental Techniques for Characterization
      • 17.5. Development of Deformation Microstructures
      • 17.6. Slip System Dependence
      • 17.7. Microstructure and Local Texture
      • 17.8. Hot Deformation
      • 17.9. Influence of Second-Phase Particles on Structure
      • 17.10. Structure/Mechanical Property Relationships, and Modeling
      • 17.11. Conclusion and Outlook
    • 18. Fatigue of Metals
      • 18.1. Introduction: History, Fatigue Approaches and Nomenclature
      • 18.2. Fatigue Testing
      • 18.3. Performance Parameters of Fatigue
      • 18.4. Cyclic Deformation
      • 18.5. Fatigue Crack Initiation in Ductile Metals
      • 18.6. Fatigue Crack Propagation
      • 18.7. Additional Topics
    • 19. Magnetic Properties of Metals and Alloys
      • 19.1. Magnetic Field Quantities and Properties Survey
      • 19.2. Magnetic Domains and the Magnetization Process
      • 19.3. Alloy Survey
      • 19.4. Current and Emerging Areas
      • 19.5. Further Reading
  • Volume III
    • 20. Physical Metallurgy of Light Alloys
      • 20.1. Introduction
      • 20.2. Precipitation and Age Hardening
      • 20.3. Aluminum Alloys
      • 20.4. Magnesium Alloys
      • 20.5. Titanium Alloys
    • 21. Physical Metallurgy of Steels
      • 21.1. Introduction
      • 21.2. Martensite in Steels
      • 21.3. Bainite in Steels
      • 21.4. Alloy Design: Strong Bainite
      • 21.5. Widmanstätten Ferrite
      • 21.6. Allotriomorphic Ferrite
      • 21.7. Pearlite
      • 21.8. Overall Transformation Kinetics
      • 21.9. TRIP Steels
      • 21.10. TWIP Steels
      • 21.11. Transformation Plasticity and Mitigation of Residual Stress
      • 21.12. Bulk Nanostructured Steel
    • 22. Physical Metallurgy of the Nickel-Based Superalloys
      • 22.1. Introduction
      • 22.2. Structure and Constitution of the Superalloys
      • 22.3. Planar, Line and Point Defects in the Superalloys
      • 22.4. Strengthening Mechanisms in Nickel-Based Superalloys
      • 22.5. Single-Crystal Superalloys
      • 22.6. Summary and Conclusions
    • 23. Recovery and Recrystallization: Phenomena, Physics, Models, Simulation
      • 23.1. Phenomena, Terminology, and Methods: Recovery and Recrystallization
      • 23.2. Recovery
      • 23.3. Recrystallization
      • 23.4. Driving Forces of Recrystallization and Grain-Growth Phenomena
      • 23.5. Dynamic and Metadynamic Recrystallization
      • 23.6. Grain Growth
      • 23.7. Secondary Recrystallization: Discontinuous Grain Coarsening
      • 23.8. Phenomenological Kinetics of Recrystallization
      • 23.9. Modeling Recrystallization and Grain-Growth Phenomena
    • 24. Porous Metals
      • 24.1. Introduction
      • 24.2. Processing
      • 24.3. Structure
      • 24.4. Physical Properties
      • 24.5. Mechanical Behavior
      • 24.6. Conclusion
    • 25. Hydrogen in Metals
      • 25.1. Introduction
      • 25.2. Fundamentals
      • 25.3. Hydrogen in Defective Metals
      • 25.4. Hydrogen in Nanosized Systems: Thin Films, Multilayers and Clusters
    • 26. Physical Metallurgy of Nanocrystalline Metals
      • 26.1. Introduction
      • 26.2. Basic Concepts
      • 26.3. Synthesis Options
      • 26.4. Microstructure Aspects
      • 26.5. Diffusion Characteristics
      • 26.6. Plastic Deformation of Ultrafine-Grained and Nanocrystalline Metallic Materials
      • 26.7. Phase Transformations in Nanocrystalline Metals
      • 26.8. Selected Examples of Application-Related Microstructure–Property Relations
      • 26.9. Open Issues and Future Perspectives
    • 27. Computational Metallurgy
      • 27.1. Introduction
      • 27.2. Structures and Properties of Single Crystals and Interfaces
      • 27.3. Stability and Evolution of Microstructures
      • 27.4. Responses of a Microstructure under an Applied Field and Effective Properties
      • 27.5. Summary
  • Index

Quotes and reviews

How does one review The Bible? Editors R.W. Cahn and P. Haasen have succeeded in producing the Physical Metallurgy equivalent. This is the third revision of the famous work, and it represents a major extension to the previous edition with at least 50% more material packed into three very substantial volumes....  --Contemporary Physics
Considering the exactness and extent of the contents, this work represents an advanced textbook, and, at the same time, a suitable handbook for University. --Metallic Materials

 
 
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