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The Handbook of Metabonomics and Metabolomics
 
 

The Handbook of Metabonomics and Metabolomics, 1st Edition

 
The Handbook of Metabonomics and Metabolomics, 1st Edition,John Lindon,Jeremy Nicholson,Elaine Holmes,ISBN9780444528414
 
 
 

Lindon   &   Nicholson   &   Holmes   

Elsevier Science

9780444528414

9780080468006

572

240 X 165

Comprehensive overview of the field of metabonomics

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Key Features

* comprehensive description of an approach (metabonomics) to characterise the endogenous metabolites in a living system, complementing gene and protein studies
* aims to be the definitive work on the rapidly expanding subjects of metabolic profiling, metabolite and biomarker identification
* covers the principles of the subject, the analytical and statistical techniques used and the wide variety of applications.

Description

Molecular biology operates at three levels – genes, proteins and metabolites. This book is unique in that it provides a comprehensive description of an approach (metabonomics) to characterise the endogenous metabolites in a living system, complementing gene and protein studies (genomics and proteomics). These "omics" methods form the basis for understanding biology at a systems level.
The Handbook of Metabonomics and Metabolomics aims to be the definitive work on the rapidly expanding subjects of metabolic profiling, metabolite and biomarker identification, encompassing the fields of metabonomics and metabolomics. It covers the principles of the subject, the analytical and statistical techniques used and the wide variety of applications.

Readership

For postgraduate qualified and professional research scientists working in the field of biochemistry/ academia/drug discovery and development in pharmaceutical companies, or working in related industries such as agriculture and plant biochemistry, forensic science, environmental monitoring, etc.

John Lindon

John Lindon is a Professor and Senior Research Investigator in the Division of Computational and Systems Medicine, part of the Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, UK. He is also a founder Director of, and a Consultant to, Metabometrix Ltd, a company spun out of Imperial College to exploit the commercial possibilities of metabolic phenotyping. He obtained his B.Sc (1966), Ph.D. (1969) and D.Sc (1993) degrees from Birmingham University UK. He was a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University, New York, USA (1969-1970), and then joined the Chemistry Department of Southampton University UK, to use NMR methods to research the properties of liquid crystals and later as a faculty member. From 1976 to 1995 he was at the Wellcome Research Laboratories (a pharmaceutical company) in the UK, occupying several senior scientific and managerial roles related to the use of physical chemical methods in drug design and discovery, latterly as Head of Spectroscopy, until they were taken over by Glaxo, now part of GlaxoSmithKline, in 1995. He then joined Birkbeck College, University of London and moved to Imperial College London as part of the transfer of the Jeremy Nicholson team in 1998. He has co-authored a book on NMR of oriented molecules, another on metabonomics in toxicology, one on metabonomics in general, one on NMR in pharmaceutical R&D and one on metabolic phenotyping in personalised medicine and population screening. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Encyclopedia of Spectroscopy and Spectrometry, is on the editorial board of a number of journals and has authored many review articles and chapters, plus more than 450 research papers. He has given many keynote, plenary and invited lectures around the world. His major research interest is the use of NMR and other analytical methods coupled with multivariate statistics to study biofluids and tissues, a field now termed metabolic phenotyping, leading to new approaches for disease diagnosis, prediction of outcomes and assessing disease risks in populations. His other achievements include the pioneering of a range of NMR data acquisition and processing methods, the use of nematic liquid crystals and NMR spectroscopy for determining accurate molecular structures in the liquid state, and the application of spectroscopy and other physical chemistry methods in drug design. Developments of NMR-based approaches in biomedical research include the use of directly-coupled HPLC-NMR for mixture analysis and application of high resolution magic-angle-spinning NMR to tissue samples.

Affiliations and Expertise

Imperial College London, UK

View additional works by John C. Lindon

Jeremy Nicholson

Nicholson obtained his BS in molecular toxicology and inorganic biochemistry from Liverpool University in 1977 and his PhD from London University in 1980. He has worked at Birkbeck College, London University, at the London School of Pharmacy and at Imperial College London and has held honorary professorships at six universities and two professorships at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, of which he was elected as an Albert Einstein Honorary Professor in 2014. He is also founder director, chief scientist and chief scientist officer at Metabometrix, an Imperial College spin-off company specializing in molecular phenotyping, clinical diagnostics and toxicological screening via metabonomics and metabolomics. His research interests include spectroscopic and chemometric approaches to the investigation of disturbed metabolic processes in complex organisms. Nicholson has received numerous grants and awards for his work, recent awards including the Theophilus Redwood Award of the Royal Society of Chemistry (2008) and the Interdisciplinary Award of the Royal Society of Chemistry for "his contributions to chemical biology, particularly mechanistic insights into disease and toxicity through the development of the field of metabonomics" (2007).

Affiliations and Expertise

Biological Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Imperial College London, London, UK

Elaine Holmes

Prof. Holmes is the Head of the Division of Computational and Systems Medicine and a Professor of Chemical Biology in the Department of Surgery and Cancer at Imperial College in London. She has over 20 years’ experience in metabonomic technology and its applications. Her focus is on the discovery and development of metabolic biomarkers of disease in personalised healthcare and population studies with significant contributions to cardiovascular, neuroscience and infectious disease research. Recently Prof. Holmes has driven large-scale profiling efforts defining the concept of the metabolome-wide association study (MWAS) in molecular epidemiology, specifically exploring the link between hypertension, diet and metabolic profiles. She has also developed methods for characterizing gut microbiome host metabolic interactions and has applied these to the study of gastrointestinal related diseases including colorectal cancer, obesity and IBD. She also has an established track record in the development of chemometric and statistical methods for analysis of Omics data.

Affiliations and Expertise

Biological Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Imperial College London, London, UK

The Handbook of Metabonomics and Metabolomics, 1st Edition

Chapter 1. Metabonomics and metabolomics techniques and their applications in mammalian systems.

Chapter 2. Cellular metabolomics: the quest for pathway structure.

Chapter 3. NMR spectroscopy techniques for application to metabonomics.

Chapter 4. High-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

Chapter 5. Chromatographic and electrophoretic separations combined with mass spectrometry for metabonomics.

Chapter 6. Chemometrics techniques for metabonomics.

Chapter 7. Nonlinear chemometric methods for the analysis of metabolic profiles.

Chapter 8. Databases and standardisation of reporting methods for metabolic studies.

Chapter 9. Metabonomics in preclinical pharmaceutical discovery and development.

Chapter 10. Metabolic applications in clinical pharmaceutical R&D.

Chapter 11. Exploiting the potential of metabonomics in large population studies: three venues.

Chapter 12. Metabolite profiling and cardiovascular disease.

Chapter 13. The role of NMR-based metabolomics in cancer.

Chapter 14. NMR spectroscopy of body fluids as a metabolomics approach to inborn errors of metabolism.

Chapter 15. A survey of metabonomics approaches for disease characterisation.
Chapter 16. Metabolic profiling: applications in plant science.

Chapter 17. In vivo NMR applications of metabonomics.

Chapter 18. Applications of metabonomics within environmental toxicology.

Chapter 19. Global systems biology through integration of "omics" results.
 
 
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