»
Infection and Autoimmunity
 
 

Infection and Autoimmunity, 2nd Edition

 
Infection and Autoimmunity, 2nd Edition,Yehuda Shoenfeld,Nancy Agmon-Levin,Noel R Rose,ISBN9780444632692
 
 
 

Shoenfeld   &   Agmon-Levin   &   Rose   

Academic Press

9780444632692

9780444632722

1040

229 X 152

Fully revised and updated to include the latest research in the field, Infections and Autoimmunity, 2nd edition encompasses the different mechanisms involved in infection-autoimmunity association and induction

Print Book + eBook

USD 306.00
USD 510.00

Buy both together and save 40%

Print Book

Hardcover

In Stock

Estimated Delivery Time
USD 255.00

eBook
eBook Overview

VST (VitalSource Bookshelf) format

DRM-free included formats : EPUB, Mobi (for Kindle), PDF

USD 255.00
Add to Cart
 
 

Key Features

  • Includes completely updated and new chapters
  • Brings the reader up to date and allows easy access to individual topics in one place
  • Identifies infectious agents as pathogenic or protective in many autoimmune diseases

Description

Autoimmune diseases are conditions where the immune system attacks the body organs instead of foreign invaders. This book deals with the various mechanisms by which infectious agents can trigger autoimmunity such as molecular mimicry and polyclonal activation. An overview is given with regard to bacteria, viruses, and parasites associated with autoimmunity, and a summary is given on classical autoimmune diseases and the infecting agents that can induce them.

Readership

Researchers, clinicians, clinical investigators, pathologists, medical students, and graduate students in the biomedical sciences as well as basic scientists in such fields as immunology, rheumatology, genetics, cell biology and molecular biology

Yehuda Shoenfeld

Prof. Yehuda Shoenfeld is the founder and head of the Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases, at the Sheba Medical Center which is affiliated to the Sackler Faculty of Medicine in Tel-Aviv University, in Israel. Dr. Shoenfeld is the Incumbent of the Laura Schwarz-Kipp Chair for Research of Autoimmune Diseases at the Tel-Aviv University. His clinical and scientific works focus on autoimmune and rheumatic diseases, and he has published more than 1750 papers in journals such as New Eng J Med, Nature, Lancet, Proc Nat Acad Scie, J Clin Invest, J Immunol, Blood, FASEB, J Exp Med, Circulation, Cancer and others. His articles have had over 35,000 citations. He has written more than three hundred and fifty chapters in books, and has authored and edited 25 books, some of which became cornerstones in science and clinical practice, such as "The Mosaic of Autoimmunity", "Infections and Autoimmunity" and the textbook "Autoantibodies" and "Diagnostic criteria of autoimmune diseases", all of which were published by Elsevier and sold by the thousands. He is on the editorial board of 43 journals in the field of rheumatology and autoimmunity and is the founder and the editor of the IMAJ (Israel Medical Association Journal) the representative journal of science and medicine in the English language in Israel, and also is the founder and Editor of the "Autoimmunity Reviews" (Elsevier) (Impact factor 7.9) and Co-Editor of "Journal of Autoimmunity" (Impact factor 8.1). He has organized over 20 international congresses in autoimmunity. Prof. Shoenfeld received the EULAR prize in 2005, in Vienna, Austria: "The infectious etiology of anti-phospholipid syndrome". He has received a gold medal from the Slovak Society of Physicians for his contribution to Israel - Slovakia collaboration (March 2006), and is honorary member of the Hungarian Association of Rheumatology. In UC Davis, USA, Dr. Shoenfeld received the Nelson's Prize for Humanity and Science for 2008. In 2009 he was honored as Doctoris Honoris Causa, from Debrecen University (Hungary), and from 2009 he is honorary member of the Slovenian National Academy of Sciences. He has recently been awarded a Life Contribution Prize in Internal Medicine in Israel, 2012 as well as the ACR Master Award in 2013. Prof. Shoenfeld has educated a long list of students (>25) being heads of departments and institutes.

Affiliations and Expertise

Head: Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases,Sheba Medical Center, Affiliate of Tel-Aviv University, Israel

View additional works by Yehuda Shoenfeld

Nancy Agmon-Levin

Nancy Agmon-Levin, MD is a senior lecturer at the Sackler Faculty of Medicine of the Tel-Aviv University. She is a graduate of Hadassah medical school in Jerusalem, Israel. Dr. Agmon-Levin has completed her residency in Internal Medicine and fellowship in allergy and clinical immunology at the Kaplan medical center in Israel. During the last 6 years she has worked as a senior physician and a scientist as well as the deputy head of the Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases at the Sheba Medical Center in Israel. Dr. Agmon-Levin is the president of the Israeli association for Allergy and clinical immunology. Dr. Agmon-Levin is active in research, training, education and patient care. She has over 100 peer reviewed publications mainly focusing on various fields of autoimmunity research, autoantibodies, roles of vitamin D, hormones and environmental factors as infectious agents and vaccines in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

Affiliations and Expertise

Deputy Head: Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases,Sheba Medical Center, Affiliate of Tel-Aviv University, Israel

Noel R Rose

Noel Rose was born in Stamford, Connecticut. He attended Yale University for his undergraduate education followed by the University of Pennsylvania for a Ph.D. and State University of New York at Buffalo for an MD. He was a member of the faculty of the State University of New York at Buffalo School of Medicine for a period of 20 years, rising through the ranks to become a professor of Microbiology and Medicine, Director of Clinical Laboratories and Director of the Center for Immunology. He then spent ten years at Wayne State University School of Medicine where he chaired the Department of Immunology and Microbiology. In 1981, he joined the faculty of Johns Hopkins University as chairman of the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases. He presently holds professorial appointments in the Departments of Pathology, Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Medicine and Environmental Health Sciences at The Johns Hopkins University and directs the Center for Autoimmune Disease Research. Dr. Rose’s original investigations on the autoimmune basis of thyroid disease in 1956 opened the present era of research on autoimmunity. He has since investigated many areas of autoimmunity and related issues in clinical and basic immunology. Dr. Rose is the author or co-author of over 800 scientific papers and editor or co-editor of 24 books. He has received numerous honors, including two honorary doctoral degrees, election to fellowship in national or international societies, service in national and international organizations and editorial boards of leading journals.

Affiliations and Expertise

Director, Center for Autoimmune Disease Research, Bloomberg School of Public Health, John's Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA

View additional works by Noel R Rose

Infection and Autoimmunity, 2nd Edition

  • Chapter 1: Introduction
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Rheumatic Fever, A Prime Example
    • 3 Guillain–Barré Syndrome, A Second Example
    • 4 Underlying Mechanisms
    • 5 Autoimmunity Vs. Autoimmune Disease: The Adjuvant Effect
    • 6 The Problems and the Promise
    • 7 Lessons of Molecular (Epitope) Mimicry
    • 8 Views of the Future
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 2: Infections and Autoimmune Diseases: An Interplay of Pathogenic and Protective Links
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Pathogenic Roles of Infections
    • 3 Protective Role of Infections
  • Part 1: Mechanisms of Autoimmunity induction by infectious agents and vaccination
    • Chapter 3: Molecular Mimicry and Autoimmunity
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Common Infectious Agents and Their Roll in Setting Autoimmune Disorders
      • 3 Neuro-Autoimmune Disease
      • 4 Endocrinological Autoimmune Disease
      • 5 Inflammatory Articular Disease
      • 6 Vasculitides
    • Chapter 4: Epitope Spreading in Autoimmune Diseases
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgment
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Examples of Epitope Spreading in Autoimmune Diseases
      • 3 Mechanisms Underlying Epitope Spreading During the Course of an Autoimmune Disease
      • 4 Physiological Significance of Epitope Spreading: Involvement of Epitope Spreading in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Disease
      • 5 Implications of Epitope Spreading in Immunotherapy of Autoimmune Diseases: Hindering vs. Facilitating the Control of the Autoimmune Process
      • 6 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 5: CD5-Expressing B-1 Cells and Infection
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Characterization of CD5 + B Cells
      • 3 CD5+ B Cells and Disease
      • 4 CD5 Molecule
      • 5 Conclusion
    • Chapter 6: T Cells and Autoimmunity
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Role of Hormones
      • 3 Role of Infections
      • 4 T Cell Signalling: T Cell Receptor (TCR)–CD3 Complex
      • 5 Costimulatory Pathways
      • 6 Cytokines
    • Chapter 7: Lymphocytes and Infection in Autoimmune Diseases
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Lymphocytes and Its Subsets in AIDs
      • 3 Causes of Lymphopenia in AIDs
      • 4 Management of Lymphopenia in Preventing Infection in AIDs
    • Chapter 8: Endothelial Cell Autoreactivity and Infection
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgment
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Pitfalls in AECA Detection
      • 3 Detection of AECAs
      • 4 Pathogenic Effects of AECAs
      • 5 Mechanisms of AECA Production in Infectious Disease
      • 6 The Target Ag of AECAs
    • Chapter 9: Microbiota and Autoimmunity
      • Abstract
      • 1 Infections, the Microbiome and Autoimmunity
      • 2 Gut Microbiome and IBD
      • 3 Microbiome and Rheumatoid Arthritis
    • Chapter 10: Infection, Autoimmunity, and Vitamin D
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 The Field of Metagenomics Is Born
      • 3 The Human Superorganism
      • 4 The Microbiome in Health and Disease
      • 5 Vitamin D Nuclear Receptor Dysregulation
      • 6 Flow-On Effects of VDR Dysregulation
      • 7 Successive Infection
      • 8 Comorbidity
      • 9 Familial Aggregation
      • 10 Immunosuppressive Therapies May Palliate Symptoms but Increase Disease over the Long Term
      • 11 Vitamin D Supplements Are Immunosuppressive: 25-D Palliates Symptoms but Does Not Cure Inflammatory Disease
      • 12 Harm from Vitamin D Is Increasingly Supported by High-Quality Studies
      • 13 The Concept of Vitamin D Deficiency Is Flawed: Low Blood Concentrations of 25-D Likely Result from the Inflammatory Disease Process
      • 14 Discussion
    • Chapter 11: Seasonality and Autoimmunity
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Seasonality and Immune System
      • 3 Seasonality, Infections, and Autoimmunity
      • 4 Vitamin D, Sun Exposure, and Autoimmunity
      • 5 Melatonin, Seasonality, and the Immune System
      • 6 Seasonality in Autoimmune Diseases: Infectious Agents, Vitamin D, and Melatonin
      • 7 Conclusion
    • Chapter 12: The Protective Role of Helminths in Autoimmunity
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 The Protective Role of Helminths in Autoimmune Diseases
      • 3 Conclusion
    • Chapter 13: Vaccination and Autoimmunity
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Vaccination and Arthritis
      • 3 Vaccination and SLE
      • 4 Vaccination and Neurological Autoimmune Manifestations
      • 5 Vaccination and Other Autoimmune Conditions
      • 6 Possible Mechanisms of Vaccine-Related Autoimmunity
      • 7 Animal Models
      • 8 Conclusion
    • Chapter 14: BCG Vaccination
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Mycobacteria and Autoimmunity
      • 3 BCG in Clinical Practice
      • 4 Intravesical BCG Instillation
      • 5 BCG and Arthritis: Mechanism of Action
      • 6 Conclusion
    • Chapter 15: Opportunistic Infections and Autoimmune Diseases
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Methods
      • 3 Autoimmune Disease and Susceptibility to Opportunistic Infection
      • 4 Opportunistic Infections
      • 5 Conclusions
    • Chapter 16: Can Antibiotics Cure Autoimmune Diseases?
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Rheumatic Fever and Group A Streptococcus
      • 3 Helicobacter pylori
      • 4 Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis and Staphylococcus aureus
      • 5 Crohn’s Disease and Enteric Infections
      • 6 Reactive Arthritis and Gastrointestinal/Genitourinary Infection
      • 7 Guillain-Barré Syndrome and Campylobacter Infection
      • 8 Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Dapsone
      • 9 Discussion
  • Part 2: Viruses and Autoimmunity
    • Chapter 17: Anti-Viral Therapy, Epstein–Barr Virus, Autoimmunity, and Chaos (The Butterfly Effect)
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction: Non-Linear Equations, Chaos, and the “Butterfly Effect”
      • 2 EBV and MS: A Paradigm for Anti-viral Therapy and Vaccines, Chaos Theory, and the “Butterfly Effect”
      • 3 EBV and SLE, RA, MG: Different Target Organs and Different Diseases, Same Virus?
      • 4 EBV Interactions with Atopic and Viral-Encoded Cytokines in Autoimmune Pathogenesis
      • 5 EBV Replication, Common Variable Immunodeficiency, and Autoimmunity: Which Comes First?
      • 6 Does the Butterfly Effect Matter?
      • 7 Conclusions: Autoimmunity and the Butterfly Effect?
    • Chapter 18: Roles for Cytomegalovirus in Infection, Inflammation, and Autoimmunity
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Roles for CMV
      • 3 Key Features of CMV Biology
      • 4 Risk Factors
      • 5 Conclusions
    • Chapter 19: Hepatitis C and Mixed Cryoglobulinemia: An Update
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Etiopathogenesis
      • 3 Clinical Features
      • 4 Treatment
      • 5 Outcome
    • Chapter 20: HIV Spectrum and Autoimmune Diseases
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Mechanisms
      • 3 Immune Restoration Inflammatory Syndrome
      • 4 Autoimmune Diseases
      • 5 Inflammatory Arthritis
      • 6 Treatment
      • 7 Discussion
    • Chapter 21: Parvovirus Infection and Its Association with Autoimmune Diseases
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Clinical Features of Parvovirus B19 Infection
      • 3 Parvovirus B19 and Autoimmunity
    • Chapter 22: Human T-lymphotropic Virus Type 1 and Rheumatic Diseases: A Link Between Infection and Autoimmunity
      • Abstract
      • 1 HTLV, the Immune System and Autoimmunity
      • 2 HTLV and Arthropathy
      • 3 HTLV and Sjögren's Syndrome
      • 4 HTLV and Other Rheumatic Diseases
      • Take-Home Messages
    • Chapter 23: Sjögren’s Syndrome: Role of Viruses and Viral-Like Sequences
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Clinical Picture (Reviewed in Ref. 5)
      • 3 Immunopathology (Reviewed in Ref. 6)
      • 4 Viruses and SS (Reviewed in Ref. 18)
      • 5 Activation of Type I Interferon Pathway in SS: Role of Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 Retrotransposable Elements
      • 6 Conclusions
    • Chapter 24: Viral Infection and Heart Disease: Autoimmune Mechanisms
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1 Human Myocarditis
      • 2 Animal Models
      • 3 Disease Progression: From Viral Entry to Heart Failure
      • 4 Molecular Mimicry Versus Myocyte Damage
      • 5 Conclusion
    • Chapter 25: Celiac Disease and Rotavirus Infection
      • Abstract
    • Chapter 26: Theiler’s Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease (TMEV-IDD) and Autoimmunity
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgment
      • 1 TMEV-IDD as a Model of MS
      • 2 Persistent Infection and Chronic Disease
      • 3 From Viral Infection to Autoimmunity
      • 4 APCs in TMEV
      • 5 Conclusions
  • Part 3: Bacteria and Autoimmunity
    • Chapter 27: Rheumatic Fever: How Streptococcal Throat Infection Triggers an Autoimmune Disease
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Streptococcus pyogenes
      • 3 Genetic Markers
      • 4 Pathogenesis
      • 5 Conclusions
    • Chapter 28: Helicobacter pylori Infection and Gastric Autoimmunity: Coincidence or a Cause and Effect Relationship?
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Epidemiology
      • 3 Transmission Routes
      • 4 Gastritis
      • 5 Autoimmune Gastritis
      • 6 Pathogenesis
      • 7 H. pylori and Immune Mechanisms
      • 8 Antibodies and H. pylori
      • 9 Does H. pilori Really Induce Autoimmune Gastritis?
      • 10 Diagnosis and Management
      • 11 Conclusion
    • Chapter 29: Multiple Sclerosis and Creutzfeldt–Jakob Disease are Autoimmune Diseases Probably Caused by Exposure to the Nasal Microbe Acinetobacter
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1 The Yehuda Shoenfeld Conjecture
      • 2 Rheumatic Fever, Sydenham’s Chorea, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Ankylosis Spondylitis as Examples of Autoimmune Diseases Evoked by Infection
      • 3 EAE as an Animal Model of MS
      • 4 Spongiform Changes in EAE, Bovine Myelin, and Acinetobacter
      • 5 Antibodies to Acinetobacter and Autoantibodies to Brain Antigens in BSE
      • 6 Implications of Anti-Acinetobacter Antibodies in BSE to Human Diseases
      • 7 From EAE to MS Via Autoimmunity
      • 8 Role of Immunity in Transmissible Encephalopathy
      • 9 The Problem with the Variant CJD Epidemic
      • 10 A Possible Link Between BSE, CJD, and MS Involving Immune Responses to Acinetobacter
      • 11 Conclusions
    • Chapter 30: Infection and Autoimmunity in Antibiotic-Refractory Lyme Arthritis
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Hypotheses to Explain Antibiotic-Refractory Lyme Arthritis
      • 3 Infection-Induced Autoimmunity in Lyme Disease
      • 4 New Protocol for Identifying Autoantigens
      • 5 Identification of Endothelial Cell Growth Factor as an Autoantigen
      • 6 T-Cell Responses to ECGF
      • 7 B-Cell Responses to ECGF
      • 8 Antibody Responses to ECGF in Non-Antibiotic-Treated Patients
      • 9 ECGF in Joint Fluid and Synovial Tissue
      • 10 Autoantibodies to ECGF and Obliterative Microvascular Lesions
      • 11 Elevated Interleukin-23 Levels, ECGF Autoantibodies, and Post-Lyme Disease Symptoms
      • 12 Pathogenetic Hypothesis to Explain the Role of ECGF in Lyme Disease
      • 13 Multi-Factorial Nature of Autoimmune Disease
    • Chapter 31: Streptococcus Pneumoniae and Autoimmunity: A Systematic Review of the Literature: How Pneumococcal Infection Might Be Related to Rheumatic Diseases
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Search Strategies
      • 3 Pneumococcus as a Trigger of RDs
      • 4 RDs as Risk Factors for Pneumococcal Infection
      • 5 Infections in Developing Countries
      • 6 Conclusion
    • Chapter 32: Mycobacteria and Autoimmunity
      • Abstract
      • 1 The Presence of Mycobacteria in Tissues of Patients with Autoimmune Disorders
      • 2 Mycobacteria and the Immune Response
    • Chapter 33: Mycobacterium avium Subspecies Paratuberculosis and Human Disease: Bridging Infection and Autoimmunity
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 MAP and Crohn’s Disease: The Hundred-Year War
      • 3 New Direction in Detection
      • 4 M. avium ss. paratuberculosis
      • 5 MAP and Human Exposure
      • 6 Genetic Lessons from Tuberculosis
      • 7 Genetic Lessons from Leprosy
      • 8 Genetic Lessons from Blau Syndrome: CARD15
      • 9 SLC11A1
      • 10 SLC11A1 in Infectious and Autoimmune Disease
      • 11 MAP and Type 1 Diabetes
      • 12 Molecular Mimicry/Heat Shock Proteins: HSP65
      • 13 MAP and Other Autoimmune Diseases: Thyroiditis and Multiple Sclerosis
      • 14 The Future: MAP and Human Disease
    • Chapter 34: Leprosy and Autoimmunity
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Pathogenesis
      • 3 Acute Reactions
      • 4 Lucio’s Phemomenon
      • 5 Leprosy and Autoantibodies
      • 6 Leprosy and Other Diseases
      • 7 Conclusion
    • Chapter 35: Screening Strategies for the Identification of Latent Tuberculosis
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 The Role of TNF-α in the Formation of Granulomas
      • 3 Latent Tuberculosis Infection
      • 4 The Test for Establising the Number of Cells Producing IFN-γ T.SPOT
      • 5 QFT-G Test Versus T.SPOT.TB
      • 6 Treatment of LTBI
      • 7 Conclusion
  • Part 4: Parasites and autoimmunity
    • Chapter 36: Parasitic Infection and Autoimmunity
      • Abstract
      • 1 Malaria and Autoimmunity
      • 2 Leishmania and Autoimmunity
      • 3 Schistosomiasis and Autoimmunity
      • 4 Onchocerciasis and Autoimmunity
      • 5 Helminths and Autoimmunity
      • 6 Mechanisms of Autoimmunity in Patients with Parasitic Infections
      • 7 Molecular Mimicry Between Host and Parasites
      • 8 Homology Between Self and Parasitic Antigens
      • 9 Genetic Similarity Between Parasites and Humans
      • 10 Significance of Molecular Mimicry
      • 11 Summary
    • Chapter 37: Toxoplasma and Autoimmunity
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 From Animals to Humans Through the Immune System
      • 3 The Evidence of Autoimmunity
      • 4 Discussion
      • 5 Conclusion
    • Chapter 38: Malaria and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Complex Interactions and Reciprocal Influences
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Mechanisms of Malaria Protection from SLE
      • 3 Autoantibodies and Malaria
      • 4 Autoimmunity and Protection Against Malaria
      • 5 The Prevalence Gradient Hypothesis
      • 6 A Role for Chloroquine in the Reduced Prevalence of SLE in Countries With High Malaria Prevalence?
      • 7 Conclusion
  • Part 5: Autoimmune diseases and infections
    • Chapter 39: Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae Antibodies Autoimmune Diseases
      • Abstract
      • 1 Crohn’s Disease
      • 2 Behçet’s Disease
      • 3 Celiac Disease
      • 4 Ankylosing Spondylitis
      • 5 Autoimmune Liver Diseases
      • 6 SLE and APS
      • 7 Other Autoimmune Diseases
    • Chapter 40: The Infectious Origin of the Anti-Phospholipid Syndrome
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Autoimmune Diseases and Infections: The Role of Molecular Mimicry
      • 3 Anti-β2GPI Antibodies
      • 4 Infection and Antiphospholipid Antibodies
      • 5 The Infectious Origin of Circulating Anti-β2GPI Antibodies
      • 6 Therapeutic Considerations
      • 7 Conclusions
    • Chapter 41: Infections and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Infections and Autoimmunity
      • 3 Viruses and Pathogenesis of SLE
      • 4 The Relationship Between Bacteria and SLE
      • 5 Parasites and Development of SLE
      • 6 The Protective Effect of Infectious Agents from Autoimmune Processes
      • 7 Genetic Predisposition to SLE and Infections
      • 8 Vaccinations and SLE
      • 9 The Risk of Infections in SLE
      • 10 Drugs and Infections in SLE
      • 11 Conclusion
    • Chapter 42: Infections and Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies
      • Abstract
      • 1 Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies: Classification, Pathogenesis, and Diagnosis
      • 2 Infections and Myositis
    • Chapter 43: Rheumatoid Arthritis and Infections: More Than an Association?
      • Abstract
    • Chapter 44: Infection and Systemic Sclerosis
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Infection as Possible Factor in SSc Pathogenesis
      • 3 The Role of Infection in the Course of SSc
      • 4 Conclusions
    • Chapter 45: Infection and Spondyloarthropathies
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Pathogenesis of SpAs and Environmental Aspects
      • 3 Interrelationships Between Bacterial Infections and SpAs
      • 4 Psoriatic Arthritis
      • 5 Inflammatory Bowel Disease-Associated Spondyloarthropathy
      • 6 Undifferentiated Spondyloarthritis
    • Chapter 46: Infection and Behçet Disease
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Behçet’s Pathogenesis and Infection
      • 3 Infection as a Trigger to BD Exacerbations
      • 4 Common Infections in BD Patients
      • 5 Infectious Complications of Immunosuppressive Drugs in BD
      • 6 Conclusions
    • Chapter 47: Vasculitides and Hepatitis C Infection
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 HCV-Associated CV
      • 3 HCV-Associated Medium-Sized Vasculitis
      • 4 HCV as a Causative Factor in Other Autoimmune Diseases Including Vasculitides
    • Chapter 48: The Role of Infection in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Initiation, Exacerbation and Protection
      • Abstract
      • 1 Human Intestinal Microbiota
      • 2 Immunity and Gut Microbiota
      • 3 Intestinal Microbiota in IBD and Dysbiosis
      • 4 Infectious Agents Conferring Protection from IBD
      • 5 Summary
    • Chapter 49: Post-Infectious Arthritis and Reactive Arthritis
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Epidemiology
      • 3 Mechanisms Involved – HLA-B27-Associated and HLA-B27-Nonassociated ReA
      • 4 Immune Response to Bacteria
      • 5 Immune Response to Viral Infections
      • 6 Clinical Manifestations
      • 7 Treatment Options
      • 8 Conclusions
    • Chapter 50: Nonnutritional Environmental Factors Associated with Celiac Disease: The Infectome
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Infection Associated With CD Induction
      • 3 Rotavirus and Celiac Diseases
    • Chapter 51: Infection and Autoimmune Liver Diseases
      • Abstract
      • 1 Primary Biliary Cirrhosis
      • 2 Autoimmune Hepatitis
    • Chapter 52: Acute and Chronic Infections: Their Role in Immune Thrombocytopenia
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Acute Infections and ITP
      • 3 ITP-Cytomegalovirus
      • 4 ITP-Varicella Zoster Virus
      • 5 ITP and H1N1 Infection
      • 6 ITP and Hepatitis A Infection
      • 7 ITP After Vaccination
      • 8 ITP After the MMR Vaccine
      • 9 Chronic Infections and ITP
      • 10 Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and ITP
      • 11 Conclusions
    • Chapter 53: Viral Infections and Type 1 Diabetes
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Epidemiology
      • 3 Enterovirus–Coxsackie Virus B
      • 4 Rubella Virus and T1D
      • 5 Mumps Virus and T1D
      • 6 HCV and T1D
      • 7 Conclusion
    • Chapter 54: Infection and Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 GD and Infection
      • 3 Autoimmune (Hashimoto’s) Thyroiditis and Infection
      • 4 Mechanisms of Induction of Autoimmunity by Infectious Agents
      • 5 Conclusion
    • Chapter 55: Pemphigus and Infection
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Clinical Variants of Pemphigus
      • 3 Clinical Evidence of an Infectious Agent
      • 4 Possible Pathogenesis
      • 5 Therapeutic Aspects
      • 6 Summary
    • Chapter 56: Infections and Autoimmune Renal Diseases
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 IgA Nephropathy
      • 3 Membranous Nephropathy
      • 4 Anti-GBM Disease (Goodpasture’s Disease)
      • 5 ANCA-Associated Vasculitides
      • 6 Henoch-Schönlein Purpura
      • 7 Cryoglobulinemias
      • 8 Lupus Nephritis
      • 9 Conclusions
    • Chapter 57: Infections Associated with Retinal Autoimmunity
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgment
      • 1 Infections and Autoimmunity in the Retina
      • 2 The Eye: Infection and Autoimmunity
      • 3 Experimental Coronavirus Retinopathy
      • 4 Toxoplasmosis (T. gondii)
      • 5 Onchocerciasis
      • 6 Retinopathies that May Have Infectious/Autoimmune etiologies (White-Dot Syndromes)
      • 7 Summary
    • Chapter 58: Oral Infections and Autoimmune Diseases
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgment
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Oral Infections and Atherosclerosis
      • 3 PD and AIDs
      • 4 Is PD a Trigger Factor for AID?
      • 5 Oral Infections and RA
      • 6 Oral Infections and SLE
      • 7 Oral Infections and Multiple Sclerosis
      • 8 Oral Infections and APS and Other Clotting Disorders
      • 9 Oral Infections and Sjögren’s Syndrome
      • 10 Oral Infections and Crohn's Disease/Inflammatory Bowel Disease
      • 11 Conclusions and Future Directions
    • Chapter 59: Infections as a Cause of Guillain–Barré Syndrome
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Definition of GBS
      • 3 Infections and GBS
      • 4 Possible Mechanisms That Can Trigger GBS
      • 5 Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 60: Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Epidemiology
      • 3 Etiology
      • 4 Pathogenesis
      • 5 Pathology
      • 6 Clinical Manifestations
      • 7 Diagnostic Workup
      • 8 Differential Diagnosis
      • 9 Management
      • 10 Prognosis
      • 11 Conversion to Multiple Sclerosis
      • 12 Conclusion
    • Chapter 61: Narcolepsy, Infections, and Autoimmunity
      • Abstract
      • 1 Introduction
      • 2 Orexin and Sleep
      • 3 Environmental Role: Infection and Vaccines
      • 4 Drawing Conclusions About Autoimmune etiology
  • Index
 
 
Free Shipping
Shop with Confidence

Free Shipping around the world
▪ Broad range of products
▪ 30 days return policy
FAQ

Contact Us