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Renewable Energy Integration
 
 

Renewable Energy Integration, 1st Edition

Practical Management of Variability, Uncertainty, and Flexibility in Power Grids

 
Renewable Energy Integration, 1st Edition,Lawrence Jones,ISBN9780124081222
 
 
 

  

Academic Press

9780124081222

9780124079106

474

Discover how electricity markets, and the physics and operations of power grids are evolving to meet the diverse needs of centralized and distributed variable energy resources.

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Key Features

  • Lays out the key issues around the integration of renewables into power grids and markets, from the intricacies of operational and planning considerations, to supporting regulatory and policy frameworks
  • Provides global case studies that highlight the challenges of renewables integration and present field-tested solutions
  • Illustrates enabling and disruptive technologies to support the management of variability, uncertainty and flexibility

Description

Renewable Energy Integration is a ground-breaking new resource -  the first to offer a distilled examination of the intricacies of integrating renewables into the power grid and electricity markets. It offers informed perspectives from internationally renowned experts on the challenges to be met and solutions based on demonstrated best practices developed by operators around the world. The book's focus on practical implementation of strategies provides real-world context for theoretical underpinnings and the development of supporting policy frameworks. The book considers a myriad of wind, solar, wave and tidal integration issues, thus ensuring that grid operators with low or high penetration of renewable generation can leverage the victories achieved by their peers. Renewable Energy Integration highlights, carefully explains, and illustrates the benefits of advanced technologies and systems for coping with variability, uncertainty, and flexibility.

Readership

Transmission and Distribution Grid Operators and Planners; Electrical, Mechanical, Power, Control, Sustainability and Systems Engineers; Energy Economists; Government Regulators and Utility Business Leaders; Researchers and Financers in Renewables.

Lawrence Jones

Dr. Lawrence E. Jones is a thought leader and practitioner with over twenty years of experience in the energy industry. His expertise includes renewable energy integration and the application of smarter technologies in the engineering and operations of electric power grids and other critical infrastructures. He also focuses on system resiliency, disruptive and innovative business models, and strategies for addressing challenges at the food-energy-water nexus. He joined Alstom Grid Inc. in 2000. He was Alstom's North America Vice President for Utility Innovations and Infrastructure Resilience and served on the company’s global Business Development team for Smart Grids and Smart Cities. He is currently Vice President, International Programs at Edison Electric Institute (EEI) and serving a second three-year term on the 15-member Federal Smart Grid Advisory Committee of the United States Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

Affiliations and Expertise

Vice President, International Programs at Edison Electric Institute (EEI)

Renewable Energy Integration, 1st Edition

  • Praise for Renewable Energy Integration
  • Dedication
  • About the Contributors
  • About the Editor
  • Acknowledgments
  • Foreword from Europe
  • Foreword from the USA
  • Introduction
  • Part 1. Policy and Regulation
    • Chapter 1. The Journey of Reinventing the European Electricity Landscape—Challenges and Pioneers
      • 1. Background
      • 2. The post-2020 Europe
      • 3. Renewable integration in Europe: Challenges and policy responses
      • 4. The story of three pioneers: History and future
      • 5. Trends & future outlook
    • Chapter 2. Policies for Accommodating Higher Penetration of Variable Energy Resources: US Outlook and Perspectives
      • 1. Recent renewable deployment trends
      • 2. Technical challenges posed by wind generation for power system operation & planning
      • 3. Economic challenges associated with high wind energy: the potential for curtailment
      • 4. Transmission development for wind integration: challenges and success stories
      • 5. FERC order 764 on variable energy resource integration
      • 6. The future of renewable development in the united states
    • Chapter 3. Harnessing and Integrating Africa’s Renewable Energy Resources
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Background and context
      • 3. Sub-Saharan Africa in the global energy transition
      • 4. The way forward
      • 5. Conclusion
  • Part 2. Modeling of Variable Energy Resources
    • Chapter 4. Multi-Dimensional, Multi-Scale Modeling and Algorithms for Integrating Variable Energy Resources in Power Networks: Challenges and Opportunities
      • 1. Power system dimensions and scales
      • 2. Modeling and analysis
      • 3. Optimization and control
      • 4. Data handling and visualization
      • 5. Integrated multi-dimensional analytics platforms
      • 6. Conclusions
    • Chapter 5. Scandinavian Experience of Integrating Wind Generation in Electricity Markets
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. The transmission system operators
      • 3. The Baltic-Nordic spot market
      • 4. Price zones
      • 5. Day-ahead grid congestion management: market splitting
      • 6. Maintaining the security of supply: regulating energy
      • 7. Regulating energy and the security of supply: making the wind turbines part of the solution
      • 8. Other mechanims and policies for integrating wind in electricty markets
      • 9. Efficient and nonefficient multistate markets (EU as a case)
      • 10. Conclusion: The moral of the spot case from Northern Europe
    • Chapter 6. Case Study–Renewable Integration: Flexibility Requirement, Potential Overgeneration, and Frequency Response Challenges
      • 1. ISO real-time market overview
      • 2. Renewable generation effects in the ISO real-time market
      • 3. Flexibility requirement
      • 4. Intrahour flexibility requirement
      • 5. Potential overgeneration problems
      • 6. Inertia and frequency response
      • 7. Sensitivities
  • Part 3. Variable Energy Resources in Power System and Market Operations
    • Chapter 7. Analyzing the Impact of Variable Energy Resources on Power System Reserves
      • 1. Reserve types
      • 2. Reserves and energy markets
      • 3. European vs North American reserve definitions
      • 4. Probabilistic methods for setting reserve requirements
      • 5. Determining VER impacts on reserve requirements through power system modeling
      • 6. Discussion
      • 7. Summary
    • Chapter 8. Advances in Market Management Solutions for Variable Energy Resources Integration
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Wholesale electricity markets and market management systems overview
      • 3. Market operation challenges from VER integration
      • 4. Advances in market management solutions for VER integration
      • 5. Conclusion
    • Chapter 9. Electric Reliability Council of Texas Case Study: Reserve Management for Integrating Renewable Generation in Electricity Markets
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Study of the impacts of wind generation on ancillary service requirements
      • 3. Wind power forecasts in ERCOT operations
      • 4. Ancillary service requirement methodology improvements to integrate wind generation resources
      • 5. Additional actions and future considerations
    • Chapter 10. Case Study: Grid and Market Integration of Wind Generation in Tamil Nadu, India
      • 1. Background
      • 2. Analysis: Implications of wind integration for the host state
      • 3. Regulatory and policy measures to encourage grid and market integration of VRE generation
      • 4. The way forward
  • Part 4. Forecasting Renewables
    • Chapter 11. Forecasting Renewable Energy for Grid Operations
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Forecast applications in grid operations
      • 3. Forecasting wind and solar energy: the basics
      • 4. Emerging forecasting products
      • 5. Looking ahead
    • Chapter 12. Probabilistic Wind and Solar Power Predictions
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Probabilistic power predictions methods
      • 3. Verification and value of probabilistic predictions
      • 4. Conclusion
    • Chapter 13. Incorporating Forecast Uncertainty in Utility Control Center
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Sources of uncertainty and variability
      • 3. Overall uncertainty characteristics
      • 4. Probabilistic operations and planning
      • 5. Three levels of uncertainty integration in operations
      • 6. Example: California ISO ramp uncertainty prediction tool
      • 7. Conclusion
  • Part 5. Connecting Renewable Energy to Power Grids
    • Chapter 14. Global Power Grids for Harnessing World Renewable Energy
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Stages toward a global power grid
      • 3. The global grid: an illustration
      • 4. Harvesting RESs from remote locations
      • 5. Interconnecting two continents over remote RES locations
      • 6. Intercontinental interconnections by direct lines
      • 7. Discussion
      • 8. Conclusions
      • Appendix A. Cable cost projections
      • Appendix B. Electricity trade between Europe and the USA: detailed analysis
    • Chapter 15. Practical Management of Variable and Distributed Resources in Power Grids
      • 1. Preface
      • 2. The early history of high-voltage direct current transmission
      • 3. HVDC for cable transmission
      • 4. HVDC for bulk power transmission
      • 5. Improved stability of the AC system by introducing HVDC
      • 6. Voltage source converter versus line commutated converter
      • 7. Large-scale variable generation integration
      • 8. Taking DC to lower power transmission levels
      • 9. Conclusion
    • Chapter 16. Integration of Renewable Energy—The Indian Experience
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Policy initiatives
      • 3. Regulatory initiatives
      • 4. Transmission planning initiatives
      • 5. Experience with RECs in India
      • 6. Challenges
      • 7. Concluding remarks
  • Part 6. System Flexibility
    • Chapter 17. Long-Term Energy Systems Planning: Accounting for Short-Term Variability and Flexibility
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Flexibility in power systems
      • 3. Modeling approaches and their limitations
      • 4. Addressing the gap between short-term and long-term models
      • 5. Conclusion
    • Chapter 18. Role of Power System Flexibility
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Metrics for operational flexibility
      • 3. Modeling power system flexibility via the power nodes modeling framework
      • 4. Assessment and visualization of operational flexibility
      • 5. Aggregation of operational flexibility
      • 6. Conclusion
    • Chapter 19. The Danish Case: Taking Advantage of Flexible Power in an Energy System with High Wind Penetration
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Distribution of generator capacity in Denmark
      • 3. The Danish markets for balancing the electricity system
      • 4. Wind is a part of the balancing solution—not the problem
      • 5. Case example: an hour with negative prices for downward regulation
      • 6. Decentralized combined heat and power plants are a part of the balancing solution
      • 7. Conclusions and recommendations based on the Danish experience
  • Part 7. Demand response and distributed energy Resources
    • Chapter 20. DR for Integrating Variable Renewable Energy: A Northwest Perspective
      • 1. Role of demand-response in integrating variable energy resources
      • 2. DR in the Northwest today
      • 3. Future of DR in the Northwest
      • 4. Thoughts on the way forward
    • Chapter 21. Case Study: Demand-Response and Alternative Technologies in Electricity Markets
      • 1. Overview of PJM wholesale market
      • 2. Opportunities for demand-response in the wholesale market
      • 3. PJM experience with demand-response
      • 4. Experience with alternative technologies in the wholesale market
      • 5. Potential future evolution for demand-response and alternative technologies
    • Chapter 22. The Implications of Distributed Energy Resources on Traditional Utility Business Model
      • 1. The evolution of traditional utility business model
      • 2. Gradual transformation of the ESI
      • 3. Why the rise of distributed energy resources?
      • 4. Rethinking the fundamentals
      • 5. New definition of service
      • 6. Responding to disruptive technologies
      • 7. Conclusions
    • Chapter 23. Energy Storage and the Need for Flexibility on the Grid
      • 1. Energy storage as an integral part of the grid
      • 2. An ecosystem of technologies enabling flexibility
      • 3. Conclusions
  • Part 8. Variable Energy Resources in Island Power Systems
    • Chapter 24. Renewables Integration on Islands
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Lessons from renewable integration studies for larger interconnected systems
      • 3. Characteristics and challenges for island systems
      • 4. Ongoing efforts for island renewable integration
      • 5. Conclusion
    • Chapter 25. Intentional Islanding of Distribution Network Operation with Mini Hydrogeneration
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Case study
      • 3. Intentional islanding
      • 4. Conclusions
  • Part 9. Solar, Tidal and Wave Energy Integration
    • Chapter 26. Economic and Reliability Benefits of Large-Scale Solar Plants
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Technology categories and production characteristics
      • 3. Overview of valuation methods
      • 4. Survey of research results
      • 5. Conclusions
    • Chapter 27. State of the Art and Future Outlook of Integrating Wave and Tidal Energy
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Tidal energy
      • 3. Wave energy
      • 4. Summary
    • Chapter 28. German Renewable Energy Sources Pathway in the New Century
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Increasing challenges of RES integration into the German electricity system
      • 3. Future outlook
  • Part 10. Enabling and Disruptive Technologies for Renewable Integration
    • Chapter 29. Control of Power Systems with High Penetration Variable Generation
      • 1. Introduction and motivation
      • 2. The case for advanced control methodologies
      • 3. The roles of inertial response, primary control, and secondary control: past and future
      • 4. Frequency regulation in power systems
      • 5. Optimal control design
      • 6. Distributed control design for practical implementation
      • 7. Case study results: multiobjective evaluation of optimal control performance
      • 8. Conclusions
    • Chapter 30. Enhancing Situation Awareness in Power Systems: Overcoming Uncertainty and Variability with Renewable Resources
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Optimizing situation awareness in power system tool designs
      • 3. The future of SA in grid operations
    • Chapter 31. Managing Operational Uncertainty through Improved Visualization Tools in Control Centers with Reference to Renewable Energy Providers
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Background on SCADA, RTUs, and protocols
      • 3. Current IEC 60870-5-101 situation
      • 4. SCADA alarm processing
      • 5. Situational awareness platform
      • 6. Abnormal state notification
      • 7. Benefits of situational awareness visualization platforms
      • 8. Conclusion
    • Chapter 32. Dynamic Line Rating (DLR): A Safe, Quick, and Economic Way to Transition Power Networks towards Renewable Energy
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. What is dynamic line rating
      • 3. Benefits and challenges of using DLR
      • 4. Implementing DLR
      • 5. Conclusions
    • Chapter 33. Monitoring and Control of Renewable Energy Sources using Synchronized Phasor Measurements
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Real-time monitoring using synchrophasors
      • 3. Detection tools for wind farm oscillation monitoring
      • 4. Testing and validation
      • 5. Conclusions
    • Chapter 34. Every Moment Counts: Synchrophasors for Distribution Networks with Variable Resources
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Variability, uncertainty, and flexibility in distribution networks
      • 3. Microsynchrophasor (μPMU) technology
      • 4. Applications for μPMU measurements
      • 5. Moving forward
    • Chapter 35. Big Data, Data Mining, and Predictive Analytics and High Performance Computing
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Sources of data in utilities
      • 3. The big data era
      • 4. Examples of applications
      • 5. The future is now
  • Epilogue
  • Index

Quotes and reviews

"…it lays out the key issues around the integration of renewables into power grids and markets…Detailed national case studies make up the largest proportion of the content and are the most valuable part, showing how the challenges of renewables integration can be met and discussing the field-tested solutions involved."--Real Power, June 2014

 
 
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