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Bioactive Food as Dietary Interventions for the Aging Population
 
 

Bioactive Food as Dietary Interventions for the Aging Population, 1st Edition

Bioactive Foods in Chronic Disease States

 
Bioactive Food as Dietary Interventions for the Aging Population, 1st Edition,Ronald Ross Watson,Victor Preedy,ISBN9780123971555
 
 
 

Watson   &   Preedy   

Academic Press

9780123971555

9780123977618

514

240 X 197

Explores the role bioactive foods may have in addressing the processes and challenges of aging and senescence.

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Key Features

  • Focuses on the role of bioactive foods in addressing chronic conditions associated with aging and senescence
  • Important information for developing research on this rapidly growing population representing an increasingly significant financial burden
  • Documents foods that can affect metabolic syndrome and ways the associated information could be used to understand other diseases, which share common etiological pathways.

Description

Bioactive Food as Dietary Interventions for the Aging Population presents scientific evidence of the impact bioactive foods can have in the prevention and mediation of age related diseases. Written by experts from around the world, this volume provides important information that will not only assist in treatment therapies, but inspire research and new work related to this area.

Readership

Nutritionists, dieticians, biomedical researchers whose focus is addressing the dietary needs of the aging population; food scientists targeting health-related product development.

Ronald Ross Watson

Ronald Ross Watson PhD is a professor of Health Promotion Sciences in the University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health. He was one of the founding members of this school serving the mountain west of the USA. He is a professor of Family and Community Medicine in the School of Medicine at the University of Arizona. He began his research in public health at the Harvard School of Public Health as a fellow in 1971 doing field work on vaccines in Saudi Arabia. He has done clinical studies in Colombia, Iran, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and USA which provides a broad international view of public health. He has served in the military reserve hospital for 17 years with extensive training in medical responses to disasters as the chief biochemistry officer of a general hospital, retiring at a Lt. Colonel. He published 450 papers, and presently directs or has directed several NIH funded biomedical grants relating to alcohol and disease particularly immune function and cardiovascular effects including studying complementary and alternative medicines. Professor Ronald Ross Watson was Director of a National Institutes of Health funded Alcohol Research Center for 5 years. The main goal of the Center was to understand the role of ethanol-induced immunosuppression on immune function and disease resistance in animals. He is an internationally recognized alcohol-researcher, nutritionist and immunologist. He also initiated and directed other NIH-associated work at The University of Arizona, College of Medicine. Dr. Watson has funding from companies and non-profit foundations to study bioactive foods’ components in health promotion. Professor Watson attended the University of Idaho, but graduated from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, with a degree in Chemistry in 1966. He completed his Ph.D. degree in 1971 in Biochemistry from Michigan State University. His postdoctoral schooling was completed at the Harvard School of Public Health in Nutrition and Microbiology, including a two-year postdoctoral research experience in immunology. Professor Watson is a distinguished member of several national and international nutrition, immunology, and cancer societies. Overall his career has involved studying many foods for their uses in health promotion. He has edited 120 biomedical reference books, particularly in health and 450 papers and chapters. His teaching and research in foods, nutrition and bacterial disease also prepare him to edit this book. He has 4 edited works on nutrition in aging. He has extensive experience working with natural products, alcohol, exercise, functional foods and dietary extracts for health benefits and safety issues, including getting 12 patents. Dr. Watson has done laboratory studies in mice on immune functions that decline with aging and the role of supplements in delaying this process as modified by alcohol and drugs of abuse.

Affiliations and Expertise

Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA

View additional works by Ronald Ross Watson

Victor Preedy

Victor R. Preedy BSc, PhD, DSc, FRSB, FRSPH, FRCPath, FRSC is a senior member of King's College London. He is also Director of the Genomics Centre and a member of the Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine. Professor Preedy has longstanding academic interests in substance misuse especially in relation to health and well being. He is a member of the Editorial Board of Drug and Alcohol Dependence and a founding member of the Editorial Board of Addiction Biology. In his career Professor Preedy was Reader at the Addictive Behaviour Centre at The University of Roehampton, and also Reader at the School of Pharmacy (now part of University College London; UCL). Professor Preedy is Editor of the influential works The Handbook Of Alcohol Related Pathology, The Neuropathology of Drug Addictions and Substance Misuse and The Handbook of Cannabis and Related Pathologies (all published by Academic Press-Elsevier). Professor Preedy graduated in 1974 with an Honours Degree in Biology and Physiology with Pharmacology. He gained his University of London PhD in 1981. In 1992, he received his Membership of the Royal College of Pathologists and in 1993 he gained his second doctoral degree (DSc). Professor Preedy was elected as a Fellow of the Institute of Biology in 1995 and also as a Fellow to the Royal College of Pathologists in 2000. He was then elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health (2004) and The Royal Institute of Public Health and Hygiene (2004). In 2009, Professor Preedy became a Fellow of the Royal Society for Public Health and in 2012 a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry. To his credit, Professor Preedy has published over 600 articles, which includes peer-reviewed manuscripts based on original research, abstracts and symposium presentations, reviews and numerous books and volumes.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Dietetics, King's College London, UK

View additional works by Victor R. Preedy

Bioactive Food as Dietary Interventions for the Aging Population, 1st Edition

Acknowledgments for Bioactive Foods in Chronic Disease States

Preface: Aging Bioactive Foods

Contributors

Chapter 1. Antioxidant Supplementation in Health Promotion and Modulation of Aging: An Overview

1. Oxygen and Oxidative Stress

2. Antioxidant Defenses

3. Oxidative Stress and Aging

4. Dietary Antioxidants in Health Promotion and Chronic Disease

Glossary

References

Further Reading

Chapter 2. Dietary Effects on Epigenetics with Aging

Abbreviations

1. Introduction

2. Epigenetics

3. SAM and Methyl Metabolism

4. Acetyl-Coa and Energy Metabolism

5. Age-Related Disease and Aging

6. Foods, Metabolism, and Epigenetics

7. Foods, Supplements, and Methyl Metabolism

8. Foods, Supplements, and Acetyl Metabolism

9. Carbohydrates Versus Fats

10. Mitochondrial Health

11. Additional Nutritional Factors in Epigenetics

12. Conclusions and Future Directions

References

Relevant Websites

Chapter 3. Bioactive Foods in Aging: The Role in Cancer Prevention and Treatment

1. The Burden of Cancer

2. Bioactive Foods

3. The Processes of Aging

4. Free Radicals, Aging, and Cancer

5. Cancer

6. Bioactive Foods in Cancer Treatment

7. Conclusion

References

Chapter 4. Vitamins and Older Adults

1. Introduction

2. Vitamins

3. Dietary Supplements

4. Conclusion

References

Chapter 5. Food and Longevity Genes

Abbreviations

1. Introduction

2. Historical View of DR

3. Neuroendocrine Hypothesis of DR

4. Longevity Genes and Relevance to the Effect of DR

5. Conclusion

Glossary

References

Chapter 6. Diet, Social Inequalities, and Physical Capability in Older People

1. Diet and Nutrition in Older Age

2. Physical Capability in Older Age

3. Does Diet Affect Physical Capability in Older Age?

4. Public Health Implications of the Links Between Diet and Physical Capability in Older Age

5. Summary

References

Chapter 7. Dietary Patterns/Diet and Health of Adults in Economically Developing Countries

Abbreviations

1. Introduction

2. Health Status of Adults in Economically Developing Countries

3. Nutritional Status of Adults in Economically Developing Countries

4. Association Between Diet and Noncommunicable Diseases

5. Conclusion

Glossary

References

Relevant Websites

Chapter 8. Diet and Aging: Role in Prevention of Muscle Mass Loss

Abbreviations

1. Introduction

2. Current Nutritional Recommendations for the Management of Sarcopenia

3. New Possible Actors in the Nutritional Struggle Against Sarcopenia

4. Concluding Remarks: Towards A Systems-Based Way of Thinking Sarcopenia

References

Chapter 9. Dietary Calories on Cardiovascular Function in Older Adults

1. Introduction

2. Gastrointestinal Hormones with Systemic Vasoactive Actions

3. Food Intake and Systemic Hemodynamic Changes in the Elderly

4. Food Category and Hemodynamic Response

5. Ingestion of Water and Food with Zero Calories

6. Postprandial Hypotension

7. Conclusions

References

Chapter 10. Mediterranean Lifestyle and Diet: Deconstructing Mechanisms of Health Benefits

Abbreviations

1. Introduction

2. Olive Oil

3. Moderate Red Wine Consumption

4. Fruit and Vegetables

5. Cereals and Legumes

6. The ?-3 Fatty Acids

7. Sun and Leisure Time: Vitamin D, Serotonin, and Friends

8. Final Remarks

Glossary

References

Further Reading

Relevant Websites

Chapter 11. Creatine and Resistance Exercise: A Possible Role in the Prevention of Muscle Loss with Aging

1. Creatine and Aging

2. Strategic Creatine Supplementation

3. Safety of Creatine for Older Adults

4. Summary

References

Chapter 12. Exercise in the Maintenance of Muscle Mass: Effects of Exercise Training on Skeletal Muscle Apoptosis

Abbreviations

1. Introduction

2. Mechanisms of Apoptosis

3. Effects of Aerobic Exercise Training on Skeletal Muscle Apoptosis

4. Conclusion

References

Chapter 13. Taurine and Longevity – Preventive Effect of Taurine on Metabolic Syndrome

Abbreviations

1. Introduction

2. Effect of Taurine on Hypertension

3. Effect of Taurine on Atherosclerosis

4. Effect of Taurine on Dyslipidemia

5. Effect of Taurine on Obesity

6. Effect of Taurine on Diabetes

7. Effect of Taurine on NAFLD/Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

8. Effect of Taurine on Aging

9. Immunomodulatory Effect of Taurine

10. Conclusions

References

Chapter 14. Preventing the Epidemic of Mental Ill Health: An Overview

Abbreviations

1. Introduction

2. Human Diet

3. General Effects of Diet on the Human Brain

4. The Most Important Brain Nutrients

5. Energy Density and Nutrient Density

6. Roadmapping the Future

7. Conclusion

References

Relevant Websites

Chapter 15. Energy Metabolism and Diet: Effects on Healthspan

1. Introduction

2. Concluding Thoughts

Glossary

References

Relevant Websites

Chapter 16. Nutritional Hormetins and Aging

Abbreviations

1. Introduction

2. Understanding the Biological Principles of Aging

3. From Understanding to Intervention

4. Stress, Hormesis, and Hormetins

5. Nutritional Hormetins

References

Chapter 17. The Health Benefits of the Ayurvedic Anti-Aging Drugs (Rasayanas): An Evidence-Based Revisit

Abbreviations

1. Introduction

2. Hypothesis of Aging

3. Ayurveda and Aging

4. Types of Rasayana Drugs and Some of Their Composition

5. Mechanisms Responsible for the Beneficial Effects

6. Conclusions

Acknowledgments

References

Chapter 18. Selenium, Selenoproteins, and Age-Related Disorders

1. Introduction

2. Selenium

3. Selenoproteins

4. Selenium Regulates Age-Related Diseases

5. Conclusion

Glossary

References

Further Reading

Chapter 19. Antioxidants and Aging: From Theory to Prevention

Abbreviations

1. Introduction

2. Free Radical (Oxidative Stress) Theory of Aging

3. Mitochondria Theory of Aging

4. Immunological Theory of Aging

5. Inflammation Theory of Aging

6. Implications of Antioxidants

7. Conclusions

References

Chapter 20. Diet and Brain Aging: Effects on Cell and Mitochondrial Function and Structure

Abbreviations

1. Introduction

2. Phenolics: Antioxidant Power of Fruit and Vegetables

3. Vitamin E

4. Quercetin

5. Resveratrol

6. Curcumin

7. Green Tea Polyphenols: Epigallocatechin Gallate

8. Combinatorial Dietary Approaches: Evidence from a Higher Mammalian Model

9. Summary

References

Chapter 21. Bioactive Prairie Plants and Aging Adults: Role in Health and Disease

1. Introduction

2. Secondary Metabolites

3. Prairie Biome

4. Grasses

5. Prairie Pulses

6. Sunflowers

7. Milkweeds

8. Rose Family

9. Mint

10. Summary and Future Directions

Glossary

References

Chapter 22. Ginseng and Micronutrients for Vitality and Cognition

1. Introduction

2. Micronutrients

3. Ginseng

4. Conclusions

References

Chapter 23. Asian Medicinal Remedies for Alleviating Aging Effects

1. Introduction

2. Antiaging Chemical Compounds

3. Plants Used as Antiaging Compounds

4. Conclusion

Acknowledgment

References

Chapter 24. Legumes, Genome Maintenance, and Optimal Health

1. Introduction

2. Genomic Maintenance

3. Bioactive Effects of Legume Consumption

Glossary

References

Further Reading

Chapter 25. Minerals and Older Adults

1. Introduction

2. Calcium

3. Iron

4. Magnesium

5. Zinc

6. Selenium

7. Conclusion

References

Chapter 26. Nutritional Influences on Bone Health and Overview of Methods

1. Epidemiologic Perspective: Overview of Osteoporosis

2. Assessment Methods for Bone-Related Outcomes

3. Nutrition-Related Alternatives or Adjuvant Therapy to Hormone Treatment for Preventing Osteoporosis

Glossary

References

Chapter 27. Skeletal Impact of Soy Protein and Soy Isoflavones in Humans

1. Introduction

2. Osteoporosis: Epidemiologic Perspective

3. Soy Protein and Soy Isoflavones: Intervention Studies

4. Conclusion

Glossary

References

Chapter 28. Soy: Animal Studies, Spanning the Lifespan

1. Introduction

2. Animal Models Used for Studying Effects of Soy on Bone Metabolism

3. Early Life

4. Early Adulthood

5. Aging

6. Transgenerational Studies

7. Conclusion

Glossary

References

Chapter 29. Skeletal Effects of Plant Products Other Than Soy

1. Introduction

2. Human Studies

3. Animal and In Vitro Studies

4. Future Studies

5. Conclusion

Glossary

References

Chapter 30. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Actions of Dietary Factors on the Skeleton

1. Introduction

2. Interactions of Dietary Factors with Estrogen Signaling Pathways in Bone

3. Interactions of Dietary Factors with BMP Signaling Pathways in Bone

4. Dietary Bone Anabolic Factors and Wnt-ß-Catenin Signaling Pathways in Bone

5. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Pathways and Diet-Induced Bone Loss

6. Potential Effects of Diet on Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Bone

7. Vitamin C

8. Future Studies

Acknowledgments

Glossary

References

Chapter 31. Aging, Zinc, and Bone Health

Abbreviations

1. Introduction

2. Zinc Status in Older Adults

3. Zinc and Bone Metabolism

4. Age-Related Bone Loss and Zinc

5. Zinc and Immune Function

6. Aging and Immune Function

7. Role of Inflammation in Bone Loss

8. Implications

Glossary

References

Further Reading

Relevant Websites

Chapter 32. General Beneficial Effects of Pongamia pinnata (L.) Pierre on Health

1. Introduction

2. Phytochemistry

3. Beneficial Effects of Pongamnia pinnata on Health

4. Summary Points

References

Chapter 33. Nutrition, Aging, and Sirtuin 1

Abbreviations

1. Nutrition and Aging

2. SIRT1 Integrates Metabolism and Healthy Lifespan

3. SIRT1 and Diseases of Aging

4. Modulating SIRT1 for Extending Health Span

Glossary

References

Chapter 34. Inhibitory Effect of Food Compounds on Autoimmune Disease

References

Index

 
 
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