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Petroleum Engineer's Guide to Oil Field Chemicals and Fluids
 
 

Petroleum Engineer's Guide to Oil Field Chemicals and Fluids, 2nd Edition

 
Petroleum Engineer's Guide to Oil Field Chemicals and Fluids, 2nd Edition,Johannes Fink,ISBN9780128037348
 
 
 

  

Gulf Professional Publishing

9780128037348

854

235 X 191

Understand and choose the best oil and gas chemical application while lowering costs and staying environmentally safe

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Paperback

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USD 175.00
 
 

Key Features

  • Effectively locate and utilize the right chemical application specific to your oil and gas operation with author’s systematic approach by use
  • Gain coverage on all oil field chemicals and fluids needed throughout the entire oil and gas life cycle, including drilling, production, and cementing
  • Understand environmental factors and risks for oil field chemicals, along with pluses and minuses of each application, to make the best and safest choice for your operation

Description

The oil and gas engineer on the job requires knowing all the available oil field chemicals and fluid applications that are applicable to the operation. Updated with the newest technology and available products, Petroleum Engineer’s Guide to Oil Field Chemicals and Fluids, Second Edition, delivers all the necessary lists of chemicals by use, their basic components, benefits, and environmental implications. In order to maintain reservoir protection and peak well production performance, operators demand to know all the options that are available. Instead of searching through various sources, Petroleum Engineer’s Guide to Oil Field Chemicals and Fluids, Second Edition, presents a one-stop non-commercialized approach by organizing the products by function, matching the chemical to the process for practical problem-solving and extending the coverage with additional resources and supportive materials. Covering the full spectrum, including fluid loss additives, drilling muds, cement additives, and oil spill treating agents, this must-have reference answers to every oil and gas operation with more options for lower costs, safer use, and enhanced production.

Readership

Petroleum Engineers, Production Engineers, Drilling Fluid Specialists/Engineers, Completion Engineers, Operation Managers, Drilling Engineers, and Mud Engineers

Johannes Fink

Johannes Fink is a Professor of Polymer Chemistry at Montanuniversität Leoben in Vienna, Austria. Dr. Fink teaches macromolecular chemistry. His career spans for more than thirty years in the field of polymers, including characterization, flame retardancy and pyrolysis of polymers. Johannes has published multiple books and articles, including Petroleum Engineer’s Guide to Oil Field Chemicals and Fluids, 2nd Edition, Water-Based Chemicals and Technology for Drilling, Completion, and Workover Fluids and Hydraulic Fracturing Chemicals and Fluids Technology, all published by Elsevier.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor of Polymer Chemistry, Montanuniversität Leoben, Vienna, Austria

View additional works by Johannes Fink

Petroleum Engineer's Guide to Oil Field Chemicals and Fluids, 2nd Edition

  • Preface to Second Edition
  • Preface
    • How to use this book
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 1: Drilling muds
    • Abstract
    • 1.1 Classification of muds
    • 1.2 Mud compositions
    • 1.3 Additives
    • 1.4 Cleaning operations
    • 1.5 Drilling fluid disposal
    • 1.6 Characterization of drilling muds
  • Chapter 2: Fluid loss additives
    • Abstract
    • 2.1 Mechanism of action of fluid loss agents
    • 2.2 Inorganic additives
    • 2.3 Organic additives
    • 2.4 Poly(saccharide)s
    • 2.5 Humic acid derivates
    • 2.6 Synthetic polymers
  • Chapter 3: Clay stabilization
    • Abstract
    • 3.1 Properties of clays
    • 3.2 Mechanisms causing instability
    • 3.3 Inhibitors of swelling
    • 3.4 Inhibitors in detail
    • 3.5 Test methods
  • Chapter 4: Lubricants
    • Abstract
    • 4.1 Synthetic greases
    • 4.2 Lubricant compositions
    • 4.3 Special issues
  • Chapter 5: Bacteria control
    • Abstract
    • 5.1 Mechanisms of growth
    • 5.2 Treatments with biocides
    • 5.3 Biocides
  • Chapter 6: Corrosion inhibitors
    • Abstract
    • 6.1 Specific issues
    • 6.2 Corrosion: application of chicory as corrosion inhibitor for acidic environments
    • 6.3 Classification of corrosion inhibitors
    • 6.4 Fields of application
    • 6.5 Application techniques
    • 6.6 Characterization
    • 6.7 Side effects
    • 6.8 Inhibitor chemicals
    • 6.9 Miscellaneous inhibitors
  • Chapter 7: Scale inhibitors
    • Abstract
    • 7.1 Scale prediction
    • 7.2 Classification and mechanism
    • 7.3 Mathematical models
    • 7.4 Inhibitor chemicals
    • 7.5 Characterization
  • Chapter 8: Gelling agents
    • Abstract
    • 8.1 Placing gels
    • 8.2 Basic mechanisms of gelling agents
    • 8.3 Gelling in oil-based systems
    • 8.4 Gelling in water-based systems
    • 8.5 In situ formed polymers
  • Chapter 9: Filter cake removal
    • Abstract
    • 9.1 Simulation of a filter cake formation
    • 9.2 Bridging agents
    • 9.3 Degradation by acids
    • 9.4 Orthoesters
    • 9.5 Enzymatic degradation
    • 9.6 Nonaqueous breaker fluids
    • 9.7 Peroxides
    • 9.8 Degradation by oligosaccharides
    • 9.9 Breaking by emulsions
    • 9.10 Special issues
  • Chapter 10: Cement additives
    • Abstract
    • 10.1 Cementing technologies
    • 10.2 Basic composition of portland cement
    • 10.3 Special cement types
    • 10.4 Classification of cement additives
  • Chapter 11: Transport
    • Abstract
    • 11.1 Tracers
    • 11.2 Modelling of the viscosity
    • 11.3 Pretreatment of the products
    • 11.4 Corrosion control
    • 11.5 Carbon dioxide removal
    • 11.6 Paraffin inhibitors
    • 11.7 Pour point depressants
    • 11.8 Drag reducers
    • 11.9 Hydrate control
    • 11.10 Additives for slurry transport
    • 11.11 Additives for odorization
    • 11.12 Cleaning
  • Chapter 12: Drag reducers
    • Abstract
    • 12.1 Operating costs
    • 12.2 Mechanism of drag reducers
    • 12.3 Drag reducer chemicals
  • Chapter 13: Gas hydrate control
    • Abstract
    • 13.1 Naturally occurring gas hydrates
    • 13.2 Problems with gas hydrates in petroleum technology
    • 13.3 Nature of inclusion compounds
    • 13.4 Conditions for formation
    • 13.5 Formation and properties of gas hydrates
    • 13.6 Test Procedures for Inhibitors
    • 13.7 Hydrate reformation in methane hydrate bearing sediments
    • 13.8 Inhibition of gas hydrate formation
    • 13.9 Hydrate inhibitors for drilling fluids
  • Chapter 14: Antifreeze agents
    • Abstract
    • 14.1 Theory of action
    • 14.2 Antifreeze chemicals
    • 14.3 Heat transfer liquids
    • 14.4 Special uses
  • Chapter 15: Odorization
    • Abstract
    • 15.1 General Aspects
    • 15.2 Measurement and odor monitoring
    • 15.3 Additives for odorization
    • 15.4 Industrial synthesis of odorants
    • 15.5 Uses and properties
  • Chapter 16: Enhanced oil recovery
    • Abstract
    • 16.1 Waterflooding
    • 16.2 Caustic waterflooding
    • 16.3 Smart waterflooding
    • 16.4 Acid flooding
    • 16.5 Emulsion flooding
    • 16.6 Chemical injection
    • 16.7 Polymer waterflooding
    • 16.8 Combination flooding
    • 16.9 Foam flooding
    • 16.10 Carbon dioxide flooding
    • 16.11 Steamflooding
    • 16.12 In situ combustion
    • 16.13 Special techniques
    • 16.14 Microbial enhanced oil recovery techniques
    • 16.15 Reservoir properties
    • 16.16 Treatment of produced water
    • 16.17 Soil remediation
  • Chapter 17: Fracturing fluids
    • Abstract
    • 17.1 Stresses and fractures
    • 17.2 Comparison of stimulation techniques
    • 17.3 Types of hydraulic fracturing fluids
    • 17.4 Water-based systems
    • 17.5 Oil-based systems
    • 17.6 Foam-based fracturing fluids
    • 17.7 Fracturing in coal-beds
    • 17.8 Horizontal wells
    • 17.9 Propping agents
    • 17.10 Acid fracturing
    • 17.11 Matrix acidizing
    • 17.12 Matrix stimulation
    • 17.13 Special problems
    • 17.14 Characterization of fracturing fluids
  • Chapter 18: Water shutoff
    • Abstract
    • 18.1 Classification of the methods
    • 18.2 In situ polymerization
    • 18.3 Acrylic gels
    • 18.4 Special applications
    • 18.5 Thermally stable gels
    • 18.6 Blocked isocyanate gels
    • 18.7 Disproportionate permeability reduction
    • 18.8 Silicate-based agents
    • 18.9 Resin types
    • 18.10 Cement with additives
    • 18.11 Organosilicones
    • 18.12 Non-Crosslinked copolymers
    • 18.13 Inorganic colloids
    • 18.14 Water swelling additives
    • 18.15 Wastes
    • 18.16 Surfactants
    • 18.17 Tailoring the hydrodynamic volume
  • Chapter 19: Oil spill treating agents
    • Abstract
    • 19.1 History
  • Chapter 20: Waste disposal
    • Abstract
    • 20.1 Produced water
    • 20.2 Drilling fluids
    • 20.3 Cuttings
    • 20.4 Injection techniques
  • Chapter 21: Dispersions, emulsions, and foams
    • Abstract
    • 21.1 Dispersions
    • 21.2 Emulsions
    • 21.3 Foams
  • Chapter 22: Defoamers
    • Abstract
    • 22.1 Theory of defoaming
    • 22.2 Classification of defoamers
    • 22.3 Uses in petroleum technology
  • Chapter 23: Demulsifiers
    • Abstract
    • 23.1 Emulsions in produced crude oil
    • 23.2 Waterflooding
    • 23.3 Oil spill treatment
    • 23.4 Desired properties
    • 23.5 Mechanisms of demulsification
    • 23.6 Performance testing
    • 23.7 Classification of demulsifiers
    • 23.8 Demulsifiers in detail
  • Abbreviation Index
  • Chemical Index
  • Index
 
 
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