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The Vitamins, 4th Edition

 
The Vitamins, 4th Edition,Gerald Combs, Jr.,ISBN9780123819802
 
 
 

  

Academic Press

9780123819802

9780123819819

600

276 X 216

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Key Features

  • Selected for inclusion in Doody's Core Titles 2013, an essential collection development tool for health sciences libraries
  • Includes approximately 30% new material
  • Substantial updates have been made to chapters on vitamins A, C, E, K, folate, and the quasi-vitamins
  • Provides checklists of systems affected by vitamin deficiencies and food sources of vitamins
  • Key concepts, learning objectives, vocabulary,case studies, study questions and additional reading lists are included making this ideally suited for students
  • Thoroughly updated with important recent research results, including citations to key reports, many added tables and several new figures
  • Addition of Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HANES III) data
  • Updated Dietary Reference Values

Description

The fourth edition of this bestselling text will again provide the latest coverage of the biochemistry and physiology of vitamins and vitamin-like substances. Extensively revised and expanded on the basis of recent research findings with enlarged coverage of health effects of vitamin-like factors, it is ideally suited for students and an important reference for anyone interested in nutrition, food science, animal science or endocrinology. It contains a cohesive and well-organized presentation of each of the vitamins, as well as the history of their discoveries and current information about their roles in nutrition and health.

Readership

Students and health professionals, also researchers in food science, veterinary and animal sciences

Gerald Combs, Jr.

Gerald F. Combs, Jr., Ph.D., is a Emeritus Professor of Nutrition at Cornell University. His specialties are the nutritional biochemistry of trace elements and vitamins, clinical intervention studies, and the linkages of agriculture and human health in national development. He has authored or co-authored 279 publications, including two major reference books.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor Emeritus, Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, U.S.A.

The Vitamins, 4th Edition

Part I. Perspectives on the Vitamins in Nutrition

1. What is a Vitamin?
a. Thinking about Vitamins
b. Vitamin: a Revolutionary Concept
c. A Operating Definition of a Vitamin
d. The Recognized Vitamins
e. Study Questions and Exercises

2. Discovery of the Vitamins
a. The Emergence of Nutrition as a Science
b. The Process of Discovery in Nutritional Science
c. The Empirical Phase of Vitamin Discovery
d. The Experimental Phase of Vitamin Discovery
e. The Vitamine Theory
f. Elucidation of the Vitamins
g. Vitamin Terminology
h. Other factors Sometimes Called Vitamins
i. The Modern History of the Vitamins
j. The Impact of the “Omics” Revolution in Biology
k. Study questions and Exercises
l. Recommended Reading

3. Chemical and Physiological Properties of Vitamins
a. Chemical and Physical Properties of Vitamins
b. Vitamin A
c. Vitamin D
d. Vitamin E
e. Vitamin K
f. Vitamin C
g. Thiamin
h. Riboflavin
i. Niacin
j. Vitamin B6
k. Biotin
l. Pantothenic Acid
m. Folate
n. Vitamin B12
o. General Properties of Vitamins
p. Physiological Properties of Vitamins
q. Metabolism of Vitamins
r. Study Questions and Exercises
s. Recommended Reading

4. Vitamin Deficiency
a. The Concept of Vitamin Deficiency
b. The Many Causes of Vitamin Deficiency
c. Clinical Manifestations of Vitamin Deficiencies
d. Vitamin Deficiency Diseases: Manifestations of Biochemical Lesions
e. Subclinical Vitamin Deficiency
f. Study Questions and Exercises
g. Recommended Reading

Part II. Considering the Individual Vitamins

5. Vitamin A
a. Significance of Vitamin A
b. Sources of Vitamin A
c. Absorption of Vitamin A
d. Transport of Vitamin A
e. Metabolism of Vitamin A
f. Excretion of Vitamin A
g. Metabolic Functions of Vitamin A
h. Vitamin A Deficiency
i. Vitamin A Toxicity
j. Case studies
k. Case Questions
l. Study Questions and Exercises
m. Recommended Reading

6. Vitamin D
a. Significance of Vitamin D
b. Sources of Vitamin D
c. Absorption of Vitamin D
d. Transport of Vitamin D
e. Metabolism of Vitamin D
f. Excretion of Vitamin D
g. Metabolic Functions of Vitamin D
h. Vitamin D Deficiency
i. Vitamin D Toxicity
j. Case studies
k. Case Questions
l. Study Questions and Exercises
m. Recommended Reading

7. Vitamin E
a. Significance of Vitamin E
b. Sources of Vitamin E
c. Absorption of Vitamin E
d. Transport of Vitamin E
e. Metabolism of Vitamin E
f. Excretion of Vitamin E
g. Metabolic Functions of Vitamin E
h. Vitamin E Deficiency
i. Vitamin E Toxicity
j. Case studies
k. Case Questions
l. Study Questions and Exercises
m. Recommended Reading

8. Vitamin K
a. Significance of Vitamin K
b. Sources of Vitamin K
c. Absorption of Vitamin K
d. Transport of Vitamin K
e. Metabolism of Vitamin K
f. Excretion of Vitamin K
g. Metabolic Functions of Vitamin K
h. Vitamin K Deficiency
i. Vitamin K Toxicity
j. Case studies
k. Case Questions
l. Study Questions and Exercises
m. Recommended Reading

9. Vitamin C
a. Significance of Vitamin C
b. Sources of Vitamin C
c. Absorption of Vitamin C
d. Transport of Vitamin C
e. Metabolism of Vitamin C
f. Excretion of Vitamin C
g. Metabolic Functions of Vitamin C
h. Vitamin C Deficiency
i. Vitamin C Toxicity
j. Case studies
k. Case Questions
l. Study Questions and Exercises
m. Recommended Reading

10. Thiamin
a. Significance of Thiamin
b. Sources of Thiamin
c. Absorption of Thiamin
d. Transport of Thiamin
e. Metabolism of Thiamin
f. Excretion of Thiamin
g. Metabolic Functions of Thiamin
h. Thiamin Deficiency
i. Thiamin Toxicity
j. Case studies
k. Case Questions
l. Study Questions and Exercises
m. Recommended Reading

11. Riboflavin
a. Significance of Riboflavin
b. Sources of Riboflavin
c. Absorption of Riboflavin
d. Transport of Riboflavin
e. Metabolism of Riboflavin
f. Excretion of Riboflavin
g. Metabolic Functions of Riboflavin
h. Riboflavin Deficiency
i. Riboflavin Toxicity
j. Case studies
k. Case Questions
l. Study Questions and Exercises
m. Recommended Reading

12. Niacin
a. Significance of Niacin
b. Sources of Niacin
c. Absorption of Niacin
d. Transport of Niacin
e. Metabolism of Niacin
f. Excretion of Niacin
g. Metabolic Functions of Niacin
h. Niacin Deficiency
i. Pharmacological Uses of Niacin
j. Niacin Toxicity
k. Case studies
l. Case Questions
m. Study Questions and Exercises
n. Recommended Reading

13. Vitamin B6
a. Significance of Vitamin B6
b. Sources of Vitamin B6
c. Absorption of Vitamin B6
d. Transport of Vitamin B6
e. Metabolism of Vitamin B6
f. Excretion of Vitamin B6
g. Metabolic Functions of Vitamin B6
h. Vitamin B6 Deficiency
i. Pharmacological Uses of Vitamin B6
j. Vitamin B6 Toxicity
k. Case studies
l. Case Questions
m. Study Questions and Exercises
n. Recommended Reading

14. Biotin
a. Significance of Biotin
b. Sources of Biotin
c. Absorption of Biotin
d. Transport of Biotin
e. Metabolism of Biotin
f. Excretion of Biotin
g. Metabolic Functions of Biotin
h. Biotin Deficiency
i. Biotin Toxicity
j. Case studies
k. Case Questions
l. Study Questions and Exercises
m. Recommended Reading

15. Pantothenic Acid
a. Significance of Pantothenic Acid
b. Sources of Pantothenic Acid
c. Absorption of Pantothenic Acid
d. Transport of Pantothenic Acid
e. Metabolism of Pantothenic Acid
f. Excretion of Pantothenic Acid
g. Metabolic Functions of Pantothenic Acid
h. Pantothenic Acid Deficiency
i. Pantothenic Acid Toxicity
j. Case studies
k. Case Questions
l. Study Questions and Exercises
m. Recommended Reading

16. Folate
a. Significance of Folate
b. Sources of Folate
c. Absorption of Folate
d. Transport of Folate
e. Metabolism of Folate
f. Excretion of Folate
g. Metabolic Functions of Folate
h. Folate Deficiency
i. Folate Toxicity
j. Case studies
k. Case Questions
l. Study Questions and Exercises
m. Recommended Reading

17. Vitamin B12
a. Significance of Vitamin B12
b. Sources of Vitamin B12
c. Absorption of Vitamin B12
d. Transport of Vitamin B12
e. Metabolism of Vitamin B12
f. Excretion of Vitamin B12
g. Metabolic Functions of Vitamin B12
h. Vitamin B12 Deficiency
i. Pharmacological Uses of Vitamin B12
j. Vitamin B12 Toxicity
k. Case studies
l. Case Questions
m. Study Questions and Exercises
n. Recommended Reading

18. Quasi-Vitamins
a. Is the Vitamin List Complete?
b. Choline
c. Carnitine
d. Myo-Inositol
e. Pyrrolyquinoline Quinone
f. Ubiquinones
g. Orotic Acid
h. Bioflavonoids
i. P-Aminobenzoic acid
j. Lipoic Acid
k. Inneffective Factors
l. Unidentified Growth Factors
m. Study Questions and Exercises
n. Recommended Reading

Part III. Using Current Knowledge of the Vitamins

19. Sources of Vitamins
a. Vitamins in Foods
b. Vitamins in Feedstuffs
c. Predicting Vitamin Contents
d. Vitamin Bioavailability
e. Vitamin Losses
f. Vitamin Supplementation and Fortification
g. Vitamin Labeling of Foods
h. Study Questions and Exercises
i. Recommended Reading

20. Assessing Vitamin Status
a. General Aspects of Nutritional Assessment
b. Assessment of Vitamin Status
c. Vitamin Status of Healthy Populations
d. Study questions and Exercises
e. Recommended Reading

21. Quantifying Vitamin Needs
a. Dietary Standards
b. Determining Vitamin Standards for Vitamins
c. Factors Affecting Vitamin Needs
d. Vitamin Allowances for Humans
e. Vitamin Allowances for Animals
f. Study Questions and Exercises
g. Recommended Reading

22. Vitamin Safety
a. Uses of Vitamins Above Allowance Levels
b. Hazards of Excessive Vitamin Intakes
c. Signs of Hypervitaminoses
d. Safe Intakes of Vitamins
e. Study Questions and Exercises
f. Recommended Reading

Appendices
Appendix A Vitamin Terminology: Past and Present
Appendix B Original Reports for Case Studies
Appendix C A Core of Current Vitamin Research Literature
Appendix D Vitamin Contents of Foods
Appendix E Vitamin Contents of Feedstuffs

Index

Quotes and reviews

PRAISE FOR THE FIRST EDITION:
"It was a pleasure to read this magnificent book that can be used for teaching and as a desk reference. In short, this is the premier textbook in vitamins and may be used at both the graduate and undergraduate levels."
-JOURNAL OF OPTIMAL NUTRITION

"This text would be useful for anyone teaching a course about vitamins."
-FOOD TECHNOLOGY

"The organization of the book is a unique and useful approach to presenting material. Students will find the formatting of individual chapters extremely useful. This is an excellent learning textbook for an undergraduate or early graduate course on the vitamins."
-JOURNAL OF NUTRITION EDUCATION

"The book is obviously valuable to those teaching or using information associated with vitamins. I also recommend the book to other teachers as a way of presenting material to students to learn rather than memorize."
-JOURNAL OF VETERINARY MEDICAL EDUCATION

"The strength of this book is the clear description of the chemistry of each vitamin and related compounds and of the biochemistry and metabolic functions in the body. For those who want to build their knowledge of the vitamins on a chemical and biochemical base, this book will prove excellent."
-AUSTRALIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL
 
 

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