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Modern Physics
 
 

Modern Physics, 2nd Edition

for Scientists and Engineers

 
Modern Physics, 2nd Edition,John Morrison,ISBN9780128007341
 
 
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Academic Press

9780128007341

9780128008287

448

276 X 216

A comprehensive introduction to modern physics

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Key Features

  • Develops modern quantum mechanical ideas systematically and uses these ideas consistently throughout the book
  • Carefully considers fundamental subjects such as transition probabilities, crystal structure, reciprocal lattices, and Bloch theorem which are fundamental to any treatment of lasers and semiconductor devices
  • Clarifies each important concept through the use of a simple example and often an illustration
  • Features expanded exercises and problems at the end of each chapter
  • Offers multiple appendices to provide quick-reference for students

Description

The second edition of Modern Physics for Scientists and Engineers is intended for a first course in modern physics. Beginning with a brief and focused account of the historical events leading to the formulation of modern quantum theory, later chapters delve into the underlying physics. Streamlined content, chapters on semiconductors, Dirac equation and quantum field theory, as well as a robust pedagogy and ancillary package, including an accompanying website with computer applets, assist students in learning the essential material. The applets provide a realistic description of the energy levels and wave functions of electrons in atoms and crystals. The Hartree-Fock and ABINIT applets are valuable tools for studying the properties of atoms and semiconductors.

Readership

Physics, Phys Sci & Engineering students

John Morrison

John Morrison received a BS degree in Physics from University of Santa Clara in California. During his undergraduate years, he majored in English, Philosophy, and Physics and served as the editor of the campus literary magazine, the Owl. Enrolling at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, he received a PhD degree in theoretical Physics and moved on to postdoctoral research at Argonne National Laboratory where he was a member of the Heavy Atom Group. He then went to Sweden where he received a grant from the Swedish Research Council to build up a research group in theoretical atomic physics at Chalmers Technical University in Goteborg, Sweden. Working together with Ingvar Lindgren, he taught a graduate level-course in theoretical atomic physics for a number of years. Their teaching lead to the publication of the monograph, Atomic Many-Body Theory, which rst appeared as Volume 13 of the Springer Series on Chemical Physics. The second edition of this book has become a Springer classic. Returning to the United States, John Morrison obtained a position in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at University of Louisville where he has taught courses in elementary physics, astronomy, modern physics, and quantum mechanics. In recent years, he has traveled extensively in Latin America and the Middle East maintaining contacts with scientists and mathematicians at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and the Technion University in Haifa. During the Fall semester of 2009, he taught a course on computational physics at Birzeit University near Ramallah on the West Bank, and he has recruited Palestinian students for the graduate program in physics at University of Louisville. He speaks English, Swedish, and Spanish, and he is currently studying Arabic and Hebrew.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Louisville, KY, USA

Modern Physics, 2nd Edition

  • Dedication
  • Preface
    • This New Edition
    • New Features
    • The Nature of the Book
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
    • I.1 The Concepts of Particles and Waves
    • I.2 An Overview of Quantum Physics
    • Basic Equations
    • Summary
    • Suggestions for Further Reading
    • Questions
    • Problems
  • Chapter 1: The Wave-Particle Duality
    • Abstract
    • 1.1 The Particle Model of Light
    • 1.2 The Wave Model of Radiation and Matter
    • Basic Equations
    • Summary
    • Questions
    • Problems
  • Chapter 2: The Schrödinger Wave Equation
    • Abstract
    • 2.1 The Wave Equation
    • 2.2 Probabilities and Average Values
    • 2.3 The Finite Potential Well
    • 2.4 The Simple Harmonic Oscillator
    • 2.5 Time Evolution of the Wave Function
    • Basic Equations
    • Summary
    • Questions
    • Problems
  • Chapter 3: Operators and Waves
    • Abstract
    • 3.1 Observables, Operators, and Eigenvalues
    • 3.2 A Closer Look at the Finite Well
    • 3.3 Electron Scattering
    • 3.4 The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle
    • Basic Equations
    • Summary
    • Questions
    • Problems
  • Chapter 4: The Hydrogen Atom
    • Abstract
    • 4.1 The Gross Structure of Hydrogen
    • 4.2 Radiative Transitions
    • 4.3 The Fine Structure of Hydrogen
    • Basic Equations
    • Summary
    • Questions
    • Problems
  • Chapter 5: Many-Electron Atoms
    • Abstract
    • 5.1 The Independent-Particle Model
    • 5.2 Shell Structure and the Periodic Table
    • 5.3 The LS Term Energies
    • 5.4 Configurations of Two Electrons
    • 5.5 The Hartree-Fock Method
    • Basic Equations
    • Summary
    • Questions
    • Problems
  • Chapter 6: The Emergence of Masers and Lasers
    • Abstract
    • 6.1 Radiative Transitions
    • 6.2 Laser Amplification
    • 6.3 Laser Cooling
    • 6.4 * Magneto-Optical Traps
    • Basic Equations
    • Summary
    • Questions
    • Problems
  • Chapter 7: Statistical Physics
    • Abstract
    • 7.1 The Nature of Statistical Laws
    • 7.2 An Ideal Gas
    • 7.3 Applications of Maxwell-Boltzmann Statistics
    • 7.4 Entropy and the Laws of Thermodynamics
    • 7.5 A Perfect Quantum Gas
    • 7.6 Bose-Einstein Condensation
    • 7.7 Free-Electron Theory of Metals
    • Basic Equations
    • Summary
    • Questions
    • Problems
  • Chapter 8: Electronic Structure of Solids
    • Abstract
    • 8.1 Introduction
    • 8.2 The Bravais Lattice
    • 8.3 Additional Crystal Structures
    • 8.4 The Reciprocal Lattice
    • 8.5 Lattice Planes
    • 8.6 Bloch’s Theorem
    • 8.7 Diffraction of Electrons by an Ideal Crystal
    • 8.8 The Bandgap
    • 8.9 Classification of Solids
    • Basic Equations
    • Summary
    • Questions
    • Problems
  • Chapter 9: Charge Carriers in Semiconductors
    • Abstract
    • 9.1 Density of Charge Carriers in Semiconductors
    • 9.2 Doped Crystals
    • 9.3 A Few Simple Devices
    • Summary
    • Questions
  • Chapter 10: Semiconductor Lasers
    • Abstract
    • 10.1 Motion of Electrons in a Crystal
    • 10.2 Band Structure of Semiconductors
    • 10.3 Heterostructures
    • 10.4 Quantum Wells
    • 10.5 Quantum Barriers
    • 10.6 Reflection and Transmission of Light
    • 10.7 Phenomenological Description of Diode Lasers
    • Basic Equations
    • Summary
    • Questions
    • Problems
  • Chapter 11: Relativity I
    • Abstract
    • 11.1 Galilean Transformations
    • 11.2 The Relative Nature of Simultaneity
    • 11.3 Lorentz Transformation
    • 11.4 Space-Time Diagrams
    • 11.5 Four-Vectors
    • Basic Equations
    • Summary
    • Questions
    • Problems
  • Chapter 12: Relativity II
    • Abstract
    • 12.1 Momentum and Energy
    • 12.2 Conservation of Energy and Momentum
    • 12.3 * The Dirac Theory of the Electron
    • 12.4 * Field Quantization
    • Basic Equations
    • Summary
    • Questions
    • Problems
  • Chapter 13: Particle Physics
    • Abstract
    • 13.1 Leptons and Quarks
    • 13.2 Conservation Laws
    • 13.3 Spatial Symmetries
    • 13.4 Isospin and Color
    • 13.5 Feynman Diagrams
    • 13.6 * The Flavor and Color SU(3) Symmetries
    • 13.7 * Gauge Invariance and the Electroweak Theory
    • 13.8 Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking and the Discovery of the Higgs
    • Basic Equations
    • Summary
    • Questions
    • Problems
  • Chapter 14: Nuclear Physics
    • Abstract
    • 14.1 Properties of Nuclei
    • 14.2 Decay Processes
    • 14.3 The Nuclear Shell Model
    • 14.4 Excited States of Nuclei
    • Basic Equations
    • Summary
    • Questions
    • Problems
  • Appendix A: Constants and Conversion Factors
    • Constants
    • Particle Masses
    • Conversion Factors
  • Appendix B: Atomic Masses
  • Appendix C: Introduction to MATLAB
    • Creating a Vector
    • Plotting Functions
    • Using Arrays in MATLAB
    • Using Functions in MATLAB
  • Appendix D: Solution of the Oscillator Equation
  • Appendix E: The Average Value of the Momentum
  • Appendix F: The Hartree-Fock Applet
  • Appendix G: Integrals that Arise in Statistical Physics
  • Index
  • Appendix AA: The Gradient and Laplacian Operators
    • The Gradient Operator
    • The Divergence of a Vector
    • The Laplacian of a Function
    • The Angular Momentum Operators
  • Appendix BB: Solution of the Schrödinger Equation in Spherical Coordinates
    • Separation of the Schrödinger Equation
  • Appendix CC: More Accurate Solutions of the Eigenvalue Problem
    • A 5-Point Finite Difference Formula
  • Appendix DD: The Angular Momentum Operators
    • Generalization of the Quantum Rules
    • Commution Relations
    • Spectrum of Eigenvalues
  • Appendix EE: The Radial Equation for Hydrogen
  • Appendix FF: Transition Probabilities for z-Polarized Light
  • Appendix GG: Transitions with x- and y-Polarized Light
  • Appendix HH: Derivation of the Distribution Laws
    • Maxwell-Boltzmann Statistics
    • Bose-Einstein Statistics
    • Fermi-Dirac Statistics
  • Appendix II: Derivation of Bloch’s Theorem
  • Appendix JJ: The Band Gap
  • Appendix KK: Vector Spaces and Matrices
  • Appendix LL: Algebraic Solution of the Oscillator
 
 
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