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Postharvest Handling
 
 

Postharvest Handling, 3rd Edition

A Systems Approach

 
Postharvest Handling, 3rd Edition,Wojciech Florkowski,Robert Shewfelt,Bernhard Brueckner,Stanley Prussia,ISBN9780124081376
 
 
 

Florkowski   &   Shewfelt   &   Brueckner   &   Prussia   

Academic Press

9780124081376

9780124104358

592

235 X 191

An invaluable resource to anyone in the fresh produce processing industry monitoring produce quality from farm to fork

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Key Features

  • Presents current research methods and applications in temperature control and heat treatments to help minimize moisture content, to prevent spoilage and mold, and more
  • Addresses challenges of traceability and sustainability
  • Presents testing and measurement techniques and applications
  • Provides technological tools to create crop value and improve both food safety and food quality

Description

Postharvest Handling, Third Edition takes a global perspective in offering a system of measuring, monitoring, and managing produce processing to improve food quality, minimize food waste, reduce risks and uncertainties, and maximize time and resources. This unique resource provides an overview of the postharvest system and its role in the food value chain, and offers essential tools to monitor and control the handling process. It shows how to predict and combat unexpected events (e.g., spoilage), and manage the food quality and safety within a facility. Proven research methods and applications from various viewpoints are available to help you maintain high-quality produce and achieve the highest yields possible. The book also explores current challenges-including oversupply, waste, food safety, lack of resources, sustainability-and best practices for production to thrive in spite of these challenges.

Readership

Postharvest physiologists or technologists across the disciplines of agricultural economics, agricultural engineering, food sciences, and horticulture along with handlers of fresh or minimally processed products within the fresh produce processing industries will find this to be an invaluable resource.

Wojciech Florkowski

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Georgia, Griffin, GA

Robert Shewfelt

Affiliations and Expertise

The University of Georgia, Athens, USA

View additional works by Robert L. Shewfelt

Bernhard Brueckner

Affiliations and Expertise

Institute fuer Gemeuse-und Zierpflanzenbau, Germany

Stanley Prussia

Affiliations and Expertise

The University of Georgia, Griffin, USA

View additional works by Stanley E. Prussia

Postharvest Handling, 3rd Edition

  • Dedication
  • Preface
  • List of Contributors
  • Chapter 1. Postharvest Systems – New Contexts, New Imperatives
    • I The world has changed
    • II Perspectives in a postharvest system
    • III Concepts in postharvest systems
    • IV New goals for postharvest systems
    • Bibliography
  • Chapter 2. Challenges in Handling Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
    • I Introduction
    • II Handling of fruits and vegetables from farm to consumer
    • III Toward a more integrated approach to handling
    • IV Challenges amenable to systems solutions
    • Bibliography
  • Chapter 3. Consumer Eating Habits and Perceptions of Fresh Produce Quality
    • I Introduction
    • II Current fresh produce eating habits
    • III How do consumers define quality?
    • IV Consumer perceptions of fresh produce quality
    • V Personal and situational variables that influence fresh produce eating habits
    • VI Concluding comments
    • Bibliography
  • Chapter 4. Testing and Measuring Consumer Acceptance
    • I Introduction
    • II Experience and credence attributes
    • III Acceptance
    • IV Qualitative tests
    • V Quantitative tests
    • VI Testing preference
    • VII Testing acceptance
    • VIII Scales
    • IX Extracting information
    • X Test sites
    • XI Consumer segments
    • XII The necessity for acceptance testing
    • Bibliography
  • Chapter 5. Nutritional Quality of Fruits and Vegetables
    • I Introduction
    • II Nutrient components
    • III Antioxidants
    • Bibliography
  • Chapter 6. Value Chain Management and Postharvest Handling
    • I Introduction
    • II Value chain management
    • III Value chain management and postharvest systems
    • Bibliography
  • Chapter 7. Consumer Expenditures on Fresh Fruit and Vegetables
    • I Introduction
    • II Recommended daily fruit and vegetable consumption
    • III Expenditure by income quantile in selected countries
    • IV Most commonly eaten fruits and vegetables
    • V Concluding comments
    • Bibliography
  • Chapter 8. Postharvest Regulation and Quality Standards on Fresh Produce
    • I Setting the task
    • II Regulation modifies value chain behavior
    • III The goals of regulation directed at the horticultural sector
    • IV Levels and examples of regulation
    • V International trade regulation
    • VI A language for regulation
    • VII Regulation within a supply chain
    • VIII On the regulation of eating quality
    • IX Regulatory issues for the future?
    • Acknowledgments
    • Bibliography
  • Chapter 9. Fresh-Cut Produce Quality: Implications for a Systems Approach
    • I Introduction
    • II Cultivation management for the fresh-cut industry
    • III Processing management for the fresh-cut chain
    • IV Future considerations
    • Bibliography
  • Chapter 10. Postharvest Physiology and Quality Maintenance of Tropical Fruits
    • I Introduction
    • II Factors affecting fruit quality
    • III Standardization
    • IV Postharvest quality improvement and maintenance
    • V Conclusions
    • Bibliography
  • Chapter 11. Microbial Quality and Safety of Fresh Produce
    • I Introduction
    • II Treatments to maintain microbial quality
    • III Detection
    • IV Future perspectives
    • Acknowledgment
    • Bibliography
  • Chapter 12. Sorting for Defects
    • I Introduction
    • II Design and operation of manual sorting equipment
    • III Automated sorting
    • IV Analysis of sorting operations
    • V Economics of sorting operations
    • Bibliography
  • Chapter 13. Non-Destructive Evaluation: Detection of External and Internal Attributes Frequently Associated with Quality and Damage
    • I Introduction
    • II External appearance
    • III Internal defects
    • IV Firmness
    • V Taste components
    • VI Aroma
    • VII Conclusions
    • Acknowledgments
    • Bibliography
  • Chapter 14. Measuring Quality and Maturity
    • I Introduction
    • II Quality and acceptability
    • III Commodity-specific quality attributes
    • IV Sample collection and preparation
    • V Maturity
    • VI Measuring quality
    • VII Sensory evaluation techniques
    • VIII Quality in a systems context
    • Bibliography
  • Chapter 15. Modeling Quality Attributes and Quality Related Product Properties
    • I Introduction
    • II What is quality?
    • III Systems approach in modeling
    • IV Examples of modeling
    • V Conclusions and future developments
    • Bibliography
  • Chapter 16. The Supply Value Chain of Fresh Produce from Field to Home: Refrigeration and Other Supporting Technologies
    • I Introduction
    • II The cold chain
    • III Logistics
    • IV Picking and packing
    • V Transportation equipment
    • VI Systems for produce in grocery stores and display cases
    • VII Summary of the cold chain
    • VIII Supporting technologies
    • IX Other technologies
    • X Developing trends
    • Bibliography
  • Chapter 17. Traceability in Postharvest Systems
    • I Introduction
    • II Theory of traceability in postharvest systems
    • III Components of traceability systems
    • IV Extended uses of traceability systems
    • V Conclusions
    • Bibliography
  • Chapter 18. Fruits and Vegetables in International Trade: Forensic Aspects of Cargo Claims
    • I Introduction
    • II Refrigerated maritime transport
    • III Cargo claims
    • IV Legal procedure
    • V Case study
    • Bibliography
  • Chapter 19. Innovative and Integrated Approaches to Investigating Postharvest Stress Physiology and the Biological Basis of Fruit Quality During Storage
    • I Introduction
    • II “Omics” technologies and postharvest stress physiology
    • III Final remarks and future perspectives
    • Bibliography
  • Chapter 20. Challenges in Postharvest Handling
    • Bibliography
  • Index
 
 
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