Stock Identification Methods, 2nd Edition

Applications in Fishery Science

 
Stock Identification Methods, 2nd Edition,Steven Cadrin,Lisa A. Kerr,Stefano Mariani,ISBN9780123970039
 
 
 

Cadrin   &   Kerr   &   Mariani   

Academic Press

9780123970039

9780123972583

592

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Key Features

  • Describes 18 distinct approaches to stock identification grouped into sections on life history traits, environmental signals, genetic analyses, and applied marks
  • Features experts' reviews of benchmark case studies, general protocols, and the strengths and weaknesses of each identification method
  • Reviews statistical techniques for exploring stock patterns, testing for differences among putative stocks, stock discrimination, and stock composition analysis
  • Focuses on the challenges of interpreting data and managing mixed-stock fisheries

Description

Stock Identification Methods, 2e, continues to provide a comprehensive review of the various disciplines used to study the population structure of fishery resources. It represents the worldwide experience and perspectives of experts on each method, assembled through a working group of the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea. The book is organized to foster interdisciplinary analyses and conclusions about stock structure, a crucial topic for fishery science and management.

Technological advances have promoted the development of stock identification methods in many directions, resulting in a confusing variety of approaches. Based on central tenets of population biology and management needs, this valuable resource offers a unified framework for understanding stock structure by promoting an understanding of the relative merits and sensitivities of each approach.

Readership

Fishery scientists and managers; students studying fish biology and related aquatic sciences

Steven Cadrin

Affiliations and Expertise

Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole, MA, USA

Lisa A. Kerr

Lisa Kerr is a fisheries ecologist at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute (Portland, ME). Lisa is broadly interested in understanding the structure and dynamics of fish populations, with the goal of enhancing our ability to sustainably manage fisheries and ecosystems as a whole. She is particularly motivated to identify complex stock structure and understand the role it plays in the stability and resilience of local and regional populations. Lisa employs a diverse skill set to address critical ecological questions related to population structure that are also directly applicable to fisheries management. Her expertise includes structural analysis of fish hard parts (e.g. otoliths, vertebrae) and the application of the chemical methods (stable isotope, radioisotope, and trace element analysis) to these structures. She also uses mathematical modeling as a tool to understand how biocomplexity within fish stocks (e.g., spatial structure, connectivity, life cycle diversity) impacts their response to natural climatic oscillations, climate change, fishing, and management measures.

Affiliations and Expertise

Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME, USA

Stefano Mariani

Affiliations and Expertise

School of Environment & Life Sciences, University of Salford, UK

Stock Identification Methods, 2nd Edition

List of Contributors

Foreword

Introduction

New to this Edition

Chapter One. Stock Identification Methods: An Overview

Abstract

Acknowledgments

Glossary

References

Chapter Two. The Unit Stock Concept: Bounded Fish and Fisheries

Abstract

2.1 The Unit Stock Imperative

2.2 Operational Definitions of Unit Stock

2.3 Fishing across Boundaries

2.4 Mixed and Shifting Stocks

2.5 Complex Life Cycles

2.6 Stocks as Closed Populations

2.7 Natal Homing Mechanisms

2.8 “Self-Recruitment” in Reef Fishes

2.9 Open Populations

2.10 Between Closed and Open Populations: Connectivity

2.11 What Do We Need to Know to Track Fish Stocks?

References

Further Reading

Chapter Three. Fishery Management Strategies for Addressing Complex Spatial Structure in Marine Fish Stocks

Abstract

Acknowledgments

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Quota Setting

3.3 Spatial Management Strategies

3.4 Summary and Conclusions

References

Chapter Four. Quantitative Traits

Abstract

Acknowledgments

Scope of the Chapter

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Nature of Variation in Quantitative Traits

4.3 Disentangling Sources of Phenotypic Variation

4.4 Conclusions

References

Chapter Five. The Continuing Role of Life History Parameters to Identify Stock Structure

Abstract

Acknowledgments

Abbreviations

5.1 Introduction

5.2 Distribution and Abundance

5.3 Size and Age

5.4 Reproduction and Recruitment

5.5 Conclusions

References

Chapter Six. Morphometric Landmarks

Abstract

Acknowledgments

6.1 Introduction

6.2 Methodological Protocols

6.3 Interpretation of Morphometric Differences

6.4 Discussion

References

Chapter Seven. Morphometric Outlines

Abstract

Acknowledgments

7.1 Introduction

7.2 Methods

7.3 Interpretation

7.4 Case Studies in Stock Identification

7.5 Discussion

References

Chapter Eight. Analysis of Growth Marks in Calcified Structures: Insights into Stock Structure and Migration Pathways

Abstract

8.1 Introduction

8.2 Methodology

8.3 Conclusions and Future Directions

References

Chapter Nine. Meristics

Abstract

Acknowledgments

9.1 Introduction

9.2 Methodology

9.3 Case Studies in Stock Identification

9.4 Conclusions

References

Chapter Ten. Parasites as Biological Tags

Abstract

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Selection of Parasites for Use as Tags

10.3 Methodology

10.4 Collection of Hosts and Parasites

10.5 Interpretation of Results

10.6 Example Case Studies

References

Chapter Eleven. Chemical Composition of Fish Hard Parts as a Natural Marker of Fish Stocks

Abstract

11.1 Principles of Chemistry Applications to Fish Hard Parts

11.2 Methodology

11.3 Case Studies

11.4 Conclusion

References

Chapter Twelve. Fatty Acid Profiles as Natural Marks for Stock Identification

Abstract

12.1 Introduction

12.2 Methodology

12.3 Case Histories

12.4 Discussion

References

Chapter Thirteen. Application of Mitochondrial DNA in Stock Identification

Abstract

Abbreviations

Scope of the Chapter

13.1 Introduction

13.2 Methods for the Analysis of mtDNA

13.3 Fish Stock Identification: Insights from mtDNA Data Analysis

13.4 Conclusions

Glossary

References

Chapter Fourteen. The Nuclear Genome: Neutral and Adaptive Markers in Fisheries Science

Abstract

Acknowledgments

Abbreviations

14.1 Introduction

14.2 Methodology—The Nuclear “Tool Kit” for Stock Identification

14.3 Matching Each Question with the Right Tool

14.4 Conclusions

References

Chapter Fifteen. The Use of Early Life Stages in Stock Identification Studies

Abstract

Acknowledgments

15.1 Stock Definitions

15.2 Role of Early Life Stage Information in the Stock Concept

15.3 Use of Early Life Stages in Stock Identification

15.4 Examples of Early Life Stage Information in the Definition of Stocks

15.5 Future Directions and Conclusions

References

Chapter Sixteen. Conventional and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Tags

Abstract

Acknowledgments

16.1 A History of Tagging and Its Use in Stock Identification Studies

16.2 External Tag Types

16.3 Internal Tag Types

16.4 Choosing the Appropriate Tag

16.5 Tagging Methods

16.6 Fish Movement Pattern and Connectivity Tagging Studies

16.7 Tagging Data Analysis for Movement Pattern Studies

16.8 Conclusions

References

Further Reading

Chapter Seventeen. Acoustic and Radio Telemetry

Abstract

Acknowledgments

17.1 Introduction

17.2 Technology

17.3 Advantages and Disadvantages of Acoustic Telemetry

17.4 Considerations for Study Design

17.5 Data Analysis

17.6 Case Studies

17.7 Discussion

References

Further Reading

Chapter Eighteen. Estimation of Movement from Tagging Data

Abstract

18.1 Introduction

18.2 Discrete Time/Discrete Stock Models

18.3 Continuous Time/Space Models

18.4 Summary and Challenges

References

Chapter Nineteen. Telemetry Analysis of Highly Migratory Species

Abstract

Acknowledgments

19.1 Introduction

19.2 Tagging Study Road Map

19.3 Satellite Linked Radio Transmitters: A Tool for All Scales but Not All Creatures

19.4 Archival Tags: There Are Many Fish in the Sea

19.5 Geolocation: Where Did My Fish Go?

19.6 Light Based Geolocation

19.7 Beyond Light

19.8 Improving Geolocation: Algorithmic Approach

19.9 The Statistical Approach: State-Space Models and the Kalman Filter

19.10 Behavior Modes

19.11 Bayesian Inference

19.12 Defining Stock Boundaries: Home Range and Utilization Distribution

19.13 Hidden Markov Models

19.14 Depth: The Third Dimension

19.15 Synthesis: From Observation to Inference and Application

19.16 Conclusions

References

Chapter Twenty. Sampling for Interdisciplinary Analysis

Abstract

20.1 Introduction

20.2 Basic Aspects

20.3 Sampling in Space

20.4 Sampling in Time

20.5 Sampling in the Spawning Area and Spawning Time

20.6 Sample Size

20.7 Applying All the Approaches to the Same Specimen

20.8 Logistics, Operation, and Organization of the Sampling Process

20.9 Exploratory Data Analysis

20.10 Conclusions

References

Chapter Twenty One. Simulation Modeling as a Tool for Synthesis of Stock Identification Information

Abstract

Acknowledgments

21.1 Introduction

21.2 Simulation Modeling to Test Hypotheses Regarding Stock Structure and Movement of Fish

21.3 Incorporating Spatial Structure and Connectivity in Population Dynamics Models

21.4 Case Studies

21.5 Opportunities and Limitations

21.6 Conclusions

References

Chapter Twenty Two. Interdisciplinary Evaluation of Spatial Population Structure for Definition of Fishery Management Units

Abstract

Acknowledgments

22.1 Introduction

22.2 A Process for Interdisciplinary Stock Identification

22.3 Case Studies

22.4 Conclusions

References

Index

 
 
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