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Marine Structural Design
 
 

Marine Structural Design, 2nd Edition

 
Marine Structural Design, 2nd Edition,Yong Bai,Wei-Liang Jin,ISBN9780080999975
 
 
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Butterworth-Heinemann

9780080999975

1008

235 X 191

The most complete guide to marine and offshore structural design by analysis, from basic design principles, to strength, fatigue and fracture, and reliability and risk assessment

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Hardcover

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USD 146.25
USD 195.00
 
 

Key Features

  • Provides the structural design principles, background theory, and know-how needed for marine and offshore structural design by analysis
  • Covers strength, fatigue and fracture, reliability, and risk assessment together in one resource, emphasizing practical considerations and applications
  • Updates to this edition include new chapters on structural health monitoring and risk-based decision making, and new content on arctic marine structural design

Description

Marine Structural Design, Second Edition, is a wide-ranging, practical guide to marine structural analysis and design, describing in detail the application of modern structural engineering principles to marine and offshore structures.

Organized in five parts, the book covers basic structural design principles, strength, fatigue and fracture, and reliability and risk assessment, providing all the knowledge needed for limit-state design and re-assessment of existing structures.

Updates to this edition include new chapters on structural health monitoring and risk-based decision-making, arctic marine structural development, and the addition of new LNG ship topics, including composite materials and structures, uncertainty analysis, and green ship concepts.

Readership

Marine structural engineers, naval architects, and mechanical, civil and structural engineers involved in structural design.

Yong Bai

Dr. Yong Bai obtained a Ph.D. in Offshore Structures at Hiroshima University, Japan in 1989. He is currently President of Offshore Pipelines and Risers (OPR Inc., a design/consulting firm in the field of subsea pipelines, risers and floating systems. In the 1990's, he had been a technical leader for several Asgard Transport pipeline and flowline projects at JP Kenny as Manager of the advanced engineering department. Yong was previously a lead riser engineer at Shell and assisted in offshore rules development at the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) as Manager of the offshore technology department. While a professor, he wrote several books and served as a course leader on the design of subsea pipelines and irsers as well as design of floating systems. He also serves at Zhejiang University in China as professor.

Affiliations and Expertise

President, Offshore Pipelines & Risers (OPR) Inc.

View additional works by Yong Bai

Wei-Liang Jin

Fellow of the Institute of Civil Engineers (ICE) and an honorary professor in Queen's University, UK. His research interest includes structural reliability, durability of reinforced concrete structure, health monitoring of concrete structures, and fundamental theories of concrete structures and their applications. He founded the group on Durability of Concrete Structures in 1995 at Zhejiang University, which carries out research on the durability problems regarding environments, materials, concrete components and structures. He has been awarded 20 research grants by the Chinese government and has published more than 200 articles, co-authored 9 monographs. He also won 3 National Awards for Science and Technology Progress and 5 Science & Technology Awards of Zhejiang Province. Prof. Jin previously held research fellowships from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and the Norwegian Council of Research.

Affiliations and Expertise

Head of the Institute of Structural Engineering, Zhejiang University, China

Marine Structural Design, 2nd Edition

  • Preface to First Edition
  • Preface to Second Edition
  • Part 1. Structural Design Principles
    • Chapter 1. Introduction
      • 1.1. Structural Design Principles
      • 1.2. Strength and Fatigue Analysis
      • 1.3. Structural Reliability Applications
      • 1.4. Risk Assessment
      • 1.5. Layout of This Book
      • 1.6. How to Use This Book
    • Chapter 2. Marine Composite Materials and Structure
      • 2.1. Introduction
      • 2.2. The Application of Composites in the Marine Industry
      • 2.3. Composite Material Structure
      • 2.4. Material Property
      • 2.5. Key Challenges for the Future of Marine Composite Materials
    • Chapter 3. Green Ship Concepts
      • 3.1. General
      • 3.2. Emissions
      • 3.3. Ballast Water Treatment
      • 3.4. Underwater Coatings
    • Chapter 4. LNG Carrier
      • 4.1. Introduction
      • 4.2. Development
      • 4.3. Typical Cargo Cycle
      • 4.4. Containment Systems
      • 4.5. Structural Design of the LNG Carrier
      • 4.6. Fatigue Design of an LNG Carrier
    • Chapter 5. Wave Loads for Ship Design and Classification
      • 5.1. Introduction
      • 5.2. Ocean Waves and Wave Statistics
      • 5.3. Ship Response to a Random Sea
      • 5.4. Ship Design for Classification
    • Chapter 6. Wind Loads for Offshore Structures
      • 6.1. Introduction
      • 6.2. Classification Rules for Design
      • 6.3. Research of Wind Loads on Ships and Platforms
    • Chapter 7. Loads and Dynamic Response for Offshore Structures
      • 7.1. General
      • 7.2. Environmental Conditions
      • 7.3. Environmental Loads and Floating Structure Dynamics
      • 7.4. Structural Response Analysis
      • 7.5. Extreme Values
      • 7.6. Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 8. Scantling of Ship's Hulls by Rules
      • 8.1. General
      • 8.2. Basic Concepts of Stability and Strength of Ships
      • 8.3. Initial Scantling Criteria for Longitudinal Strength
      • 8.4. Initial Scantling Criteria for Transverse Strength
      • 8.5. Initial Scantling Criteria for Local Strength
    • Chapter 9. Ship Hull Scantling Design by Analysis
      • 9.1. General
      • 9.2. Design Loads
      • 9.3. Strength Analysis Using Finite Element Methods
      • 9.4. Fatigue Damage Evaluation
    • Chapter 10. Offshore Soil Geotechnics
      • 10.1. Introduction
      • 10.2. Subsea Soil Investigation
      • 10.3. Deepwater Foundation
    • Chapter 11. Offshore Structural Analysis
      • 11.1. Introduction
      • 11.2. Project Planning
      • 11.3. Use of Finite Element Analysis
      • 11.4. Design Loads and Load Application
      • 11.5. Structural Modeling
    • Chapter 12. Development of Arctic Offshore Technology
      • 12.1. Historical Background
      • 12.2. The Research Incentive
      • 12.3. Industrial Development in Cold Regions
      • 12.4. The Arctic Offshore Technology Program
      • 12.5. Highlights
      • 12.6. Conclusion
    • Chapter 13. Limit-State Design of Offshore Structures
      • 13.1. Limit-State Design
      • 13.2. ULS Design
      • 13.3. FLS Design
    • Chapter 14. Ship Vibrations and Noise Control
      • 14.1. Introduction
      • 14.2. Basic Beam Theory of Ship Vibration
      • 14.3. Beam Theory of Steady-State Ship Vibration
      • 14.4. Damping of Hull Vibration
      • 14.5. Vibration and Noise Control
      • 14.6. Vibration Analysis
  • Part 2. Ultimate Strength
    • Chapter 15. Buckling/Collapse of Columns and Beam-Columns
      • 15.1. Buckling Behavior and Ultimate Strength of Columns
      • 15.2. Buckling Behavior and Ultimate Strength of Beam-Columns
      • 15.3. Plastic Design of Beam-Columns
      • 15.4. Examples
    • Chapter 16. Buckling and Local Buckling of Tubular Members
      • 16.1. Introduction
      • 16.2. Experiments
      • 16.3. Theory of Analysis
      • 16.4. Calculation Results
      • 16.5. Conclusions
      • 16.6. Example
    • Chapter 17. Ultimate Strength of Plates and Stiffened Plates
      • 17.1. Introduction
      • 17.2. Combined Loads
      • 17.3. Buckling Strength of Plates
      • 17.4. Ultimate Strength of Unstiffened Plates
      • 17.5. Ultimate Strength of Stiffened Panels
      • 17.6. Gross Buckling of Stiffened Panels (Overall Grillage Buckling)
    • Chapter 18. Ultimate Strength of Cylindrical Shells
      • 18.1. Introduction
      • 18.2. Elastic Buckling of Unstiffened Cylindrical Shells
      • 18.3. Buckling of Ring-Stiffened Shells
      • 18.4. Buckling of Stringer- and Ring-Stiffened Shells
    • Chapter 19. A Theory of Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis
      • 19.1. General
      • 19.2. Elastic Beam-Column with Large Displacements
      • 19.3. The Plastic Node Method
      • 19.4. Transformation Matrix
      • 19.5. Appendix A: Stress-Based Plasticity Constitutive Equations
      • 19.6. Appendix B: Deformation Matrix
    • Chapter 20. Collapse Analysis of Ship Hulls
      • 20.1. Introduction
      • 20.2. Hull Structural Analysis Based on the PNM
      • 20.3. Analytical Equations for Hull Girder Ultimate Strength
      • 20.4. Modified Smith Method Accounting for Corrosion and Fatigue Defects
      • 20.5. Comparisons of Hull Girder Strength Equations and Smith Method
      • 20.6. Numerical Examples Using the Proposed PNM
      • 20.7. Conclusions
    • Chapter 21. Offshore Structures Under Impact Loads
      • 21.1. General
      • 21.2. Finite Element Formulation
      • 21.3. Collision Mechanics
      • 21.4. Examples
      • 21.5. Conclusions
    • Chapter 22. Offshore Structures Under Earthquake Loads
      • 22.1. General
      • 22.2. Earthquake Design per API RP2A
      • 22.3. Equations and Motion
      • 22.4. Numerical Examples
      • 22.5. Conclusions
    • Chapter 23. Ship Collision and Grounding
      • 23.1. Introduction
      • 23.2. Mechanics of Ship Collision and Grounding
      • 23.3. Ship Collision Research
      • 23.4. Ship Grounding Research
      • 23.5. Designs against Collision and Grounding
  • Part 3. Fatigue and Fracture
    • Chapter 24. Mechanism of Fatigue and Fracture
      • 24.1. Introduction
      • 24.2. Fatigue Overview
      • 24.3. Stress-Controlled Fatigue
      • 24.4. Cumulative Damage for Variable Amplitude Loading
      • 24.5. Strain-Controlled Fatigue
      • 24.6. Fracture Mechanics in Fatigue Analysis
      • 24.7. Examples
    • Chapter 25. Fatigue Capacity
      • 25.1. S–N Curves
      • 25.2. Estimation of the Stress Range
      • 25.3. Stress Concentration Factors
      • 25.4. Examples
    • Chapter 26. Fatigue Loading and Stresses
      • 26.1. Introduction
      • 26.2. Fatigue Loading for Oceangoing Ships
      • 26.3. Fatigue Stresses
      • 26.4. Fatigue Loading Defined Using Scatter Diagrams
      • 26.5. Fatigue Load Combinations
      • 26.6. Examples
      • 26.7. Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 27. Simplified Fatigue Assessment
      • 27.1. Introduction
      • 27.2. Deterministic Fatigue Analysis
      • 27.3. Simplified Fatigue Assessment
      • 27.4. Simplified Fatigue Assessment for Bilinear S–N Curves
      • 27.5. Allowable Stress Range
      • 27.6. Design Criteria for Connections around Cutout Openings
      • 27.7. Examples
    • Chapter 28. Spectral Fatigue Analysis and Design
      • 28.1. Introduction
      • 28.2. Spectral Fatigue Analysis
      • 28.3. Time–Domain Fatigue Analysis
      • 28.4. Structural Analysis
      • 28.5. Fatigue Analysis and Design
      • 28.6. Classification Society Interface
    • Chapter 29. Application of Fracture Mechanics
      • 29.1. Introduction
      • 29.2. Level 1: The CTOD Design Curve
      • 29.3. Level 2: The Central Electricity Generating Board R6 Diagram
      • 29.4. Level 3: The FAD
      • 29.5. Fatigue Damage Estimation Based on Fracture Mechanics
      • 29.6. Comparison of Fracture Mechanics and S–N Curve Approaches for Fatigue Assessment
      • 29.7. Fracture Mechanics Applied in Aerospace and Power Generation Industries
      • 29.8. Examples
    • Chapter 30. Material Selections and Damage Tolerance Criteria
      • 30.1. Introduction
      • 30.2. Material Selection and Fracture Prevention
      • 30.3. Weld Improvement and Repair
      • 30.4. Damage Tolerance Criteria
      • 30.5. Nondestructive Inspection
  • Part 4. Structural Reliability
    • Chapter 31. Basics of Structural Reliability
      • 31.1. Introduction
      • 31.2. Uncertainty and Uncertainty Modeling
      • 31.3. Basic Concepts
      • 31.4. Component Reliability
      • 31.5. System Reliability Analysis
      • 31.6. Combination of Statistical Loads
      • 31.7. Time-Variant Reliability
      • 31.8. Reliability Updating
      • 31.9. Target Probability
      • 31.10. Software for Reliability Calculations
      • 31.11. Numerical Examples
    • Chapter 32. Structural Reliability Analysis Using Uncertainty Theory
      • 32.1. Introduction
      • 32.2. Preliminaries
      • 32.3. Structural Reliability
      • 32.4. Numerical Examples
      • 32.5. Conclusions
    • Chapter 33. Random Variables and Uncertainty Analysis
      • 33.1. Introduction
      • 33.2. Random Variables
      • 33.3. Uncertainty Analysis
      • 33.4. Selection of Distribution Functions
      • 33.5. Uncertainty in Ship Structural Design
    • Chapter 34. Reliability of Ship Structures
      • 34.1. General
      • 34.2. Closed Form Method for Hull Girder Reliability
      • 34.3. Load Effects and Load Combination
      • 34.4. Procedure for Reliability Analysis of Ship Structures
      • 34.5. Time-Variant Reliability Assessment of FPSO Hull Girders
    • Chapter 35. Reliability-Based Design and Code Calibration
      • 35.1. General
      • 35.2. General Design Principles
      • 35.3. Reliability-Based Design
      • 35.4. Reliability-Based Code Calibrations
      • 35.5. Numerical Example for Tubular Structure
      • 35.6. Numerical Example for Hull Girder Collapse of FPSOs
      • 35.7. LRFD Example for Plates of Semisubmersible Platforms
    • Chapter 36. Fatigue Reliability
      • 36.1. Introduction
      • 36.2. Uncertainty in Fatigue Stress Model
      • 36.3. Fatigue Reliability Models
      • 36.4. Calibration of FM Model by S–N Approach
      • 36.5. Fatigue Reliability Application—Fatigue Safety Check
      • 36.6. Numerical Examples
    • Chapter 37. Probability- and Risk-Based Inspection Planning
      • 37.1. Introduction
      • 37.2. Concepts for Risk-Based Inspection Planning
      • 37.3. Reliability-Updating Theory for Probability-Based Inspection Planning
      • 37.4. Risk-Based Inspection Examples
      • 37.5. Risk-Based “Optimum” Inspection
  • Part 5. Risk Assessment
    • Chapter 38. Risk Assessment Methodology
      • 38.1. Introduction
      • 38.2. Risk Estimation
      • 38.3. Risk Acceptance Criteria
      • 38.4. Using Risk Assessment to Determine Performance Standard
    • Chapter 39. Risk-Based Decision-Making
      • 39.1. Basic Probability Concepts
      • 39.2. The RBDM Process
      • 39.3. A Step-by-step Example of the RBDM Process in the Field
    • Chapter 40. Risk Assessment Applied to Offshore Structures
      • 40.1. Introduction
      • 40.2. Collision Risk
      • 40.3. Explosion Risk
      • 40.4. Fire Risk
      • 40.5. Dropped Objects
      • 40.6. Case Study—Risk Assessment of Floating Production Systems
      • 40.7. Environmental Impact Assessment
    • Chapter 41. Formal Safety Assessment Applied to Shipping Industry
      • 41.1. Introduction
      • 41.2. Overview of FSA
      • 41.3. Functional Components of the FSA
      • 41.4. HOF in the FSA
      • 41.5. An Example Application to the Ship's Fuel System
      • 41.6. Concerns Regarding the Use of FSA in Shipping
    • Chapter 42. Economic Risk Assessment for Field Development
      • 42.1. Introduction
      • 42.2. Decision Criteria and Limit-State Functions
      • 42.3. Economic Risk Modeling
      • 42.4. Results Evaluation
    • Chapter 43. Human Reliability Assessment
      • 43.1. Introduction
      • 43.2. Human Error Identification
      • 43.3. Human Error Analysis
      • 43.4. Human Error Reduction
      • 43.5. Ergonomics Applied to Design of Marine Systems
      • 43.6. QA and Quality Control
      • 43.7. Human and Organizational Factors in Offshore Structures
    • Chapter 44. Risk-Centered Maintenance
      • 44.1. Introduction
      • 44.2. Preliminary Risk Analysis
      • 44.3. RCM Process
      • 44.4. RCM Application to a Shell and Tube Heat Exchanger on Floating Production, Storage, and Offloading
  • Part 6. Fixed Platforms and FPSO
    • Chapter 45. Structural Reassessment of Offshore Structures
      • 45.1. Introduction
      • 45.2. Corrosion Model and Crack Defects Analysis
      • 45.3. The Residual Ultimate Strength of Hull Structural Components
      • 45.4. The Residual Ultimate Strength of Hull Structures with Crack and Corrosion Damage
    • Chapter 46. Time-Dependent Reliability Assessment of Offshore Jacket Platforms
      • 46.1. Introduction
      • 46.2. The Time-Dependent Reliability Model for the Jacket Platform
      • 46.3. Probability Model for Resistance of the Jacket Platform
      • 46.4. Probability Model for Load Effect of the Jacket Platform
      • 46.5. Time-Dependent Reliability Assessment
      • 46.6. Conclusion
    • Chapter 47. Reassessment of Jacket Structure
      • 47.1. General
      • 47.2. Modeling
      • 47.3. Pushover Analysis
      • 47.4. Corrosion Effect on the Jacket Structure
      • 47.5. Comparing Corrosion Effect
      • 47.6. Conclusion
    • Chapter 48. Risk and Reliability Applications to FPSO
      • 48.1. General
      • 48.2. Risk-Based Classification
      • 48.3. Risk-Based Inspection
      • 48.4. Risk-Based Survey
    • Chapter 49. Explosion and Fire Response Analysis for FPSO
      • 49.1. Introduction
      • 49.2. Accident Causation Analysis
      • 49.3. Phase I: Identification of Dangerous Sources
      • 49.4. Phase II: Risk Assessment and Management
      • 49.5. Phase III: Risk Restraining Project
      • 49.6. Examples of Explosion Response of FPSO
      • 49.7. Example of Fire Response of FPSO
    • Chapter 50. Asset Integrity Management (AIM) for FPSO
      • 50.1. Introduction
      • 50.2. Basic Theory for RBM
      • 50.3. Risk-Based Inspection
      • 50.4. Safety Integrity Level Assessment
      • 50.5. Reliability-Centered Maintenance
      • 50.6. Engineering Projects
  • Index
 
 
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