Kathleen Mann Koepke

Kathleen Mann Koepke

Kathleen Mann Koepke, Ph.D., is Director of the Math and Science Cognition and Learning, Development & Disorders Program in the Child Devlopment and Behavior Branch (CDBB) of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Rockville, MD (kmk@nih.gov). Dr. Mann Koepke oversees a research program focused on developing and supporting research and training initiatives to increase knowledge relevant to the development of math and science cogniton, reasoning, knowledge, and abilities, both in animals and in humans from birth through all years of formal education in diverse learners with and without disabilities. This research focus recently lead to her serving as co-Guest Editor of a special journal issue regarding the co-occurrence of math and reading disabilities (Mann Koepke, K and Miller, B. (Eds.) At the Intersection of Math & Reading Disabilities. Journal of Learning Disabilities. 2013: 46(6)). She is a lifecourse developmental cognitive neuroscientist/psychologist with a passion to serve the cognitively challenged and/or disabled via promoting new and innovative basic research and theoretically-grounded evidence-based intervention strategies to maximuze function. Dr. Mann Koepke has served in the Division of Extramural Programs across the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), and now NICHD, overseeing research on cognitive and neurological development and disorders, including neurobiological, behavioral and caregiving research foci. She has served on numerous federal and national committees aimed at advancing research and services for young learners and persons with cognitive and/or physical disability or differences, co-authoring numerous calls for new research to close significant gaps, as well as peer-reviewed publications. Prior to coming to NIH, she was faculty in Neurology (Psychology) at Washington University-St. Louis School of Medicine where she managed the university’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (supported in part by grant P50AG05681), and served as Director of its Education Core and its Rural Outreach Satellite. While there, expanding on her enthusiasm for the use of newly developed technologies as tools for cognition, she developed and regularly contributed to the first-ever freely available web-based online educational support system for anyone interested in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and for formal and informal dementia patient caregivers; the cite has garnered numerous national and international awards. This early online educational service has been used & replicated around the globe as a model for online disease/disabilty-focused educational support service.

Affiliations and Expertise

National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, NIH, Rockville, MD, USA