John C. Lindon

John C. Lindon

John Lindon is a Professor and Senior Research Investigator in the Division of Computational and Systems Medicine, part of the Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, UK. He is also a founder Director of, and a Consultant to, Metabometrix Ltd, a company spun out of Imperial College to exploit the commercial possibilities of metabolic phenotyping. He obtained his B.Sc (1966), Ph.D. (1969) and D.Sc (1993) degrees from Birmingham University UK. He was a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University, New York, USA (1969-1970), and then joined the Chemistry Department of Southampton University UK, to use NMR methods to research the properties of liquid crystals and later as a faculty member. From 1976 to 1995 he was at the Wellcome Research Laboratories (a pharmaceutical company) in the UK, occupying several senior scientific and managerial roles related to the use of physical chemical methods in drug design and discovery, latterly as Head of Spectroscopy, until they were taken over by Glaxo, now part of GlaxoSmithKline in 1995. He then joined Birkbeck College, University of London and moved to Imperial College London as part of the transfer of the Jeremy Nicholson team in 1998. He has co-authored a book on NMR of oriented molecules, another on metabonomics in toxicology, one on metabonomics in general, one on NMR in pharmaceutical &D and one on metabolic phenotyping in personalised medicine and population screening. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Encyclopedia of Spectroscopy and Spectrometry with a third edition in preparation, is on the editorial board of a number of journals and has authored many review articles and chapters, plus more than 450 research papers. He has given many key-note, plenary and invited lectures around the world. His major research interest is the use of NMR and other analytical methods coupled with multivariate statistics to study biofluids and tissues, a field now termed metabolic phenotyping, leading to new approaches for disease diagnosis, prediction of outcomes and assessing disease risks in populations. His other achievements include the pioneering of a range of NMR data acquisition and processing methods, the use of nematic liquid crystals and NMR spectroscopy for determing accurate molecular structures in the liquid state, and the application of spectroscopy and other physical chemistry methods in drug design. Developments of NMR-based approaches in biomedical research include the use of directly-coupled HPLC-NMR fo mixture analysis and application of high resolution magic-angle-spinning NMR to tissue samples.

Affiliations and Expertise

Imperial College London, UK