Edward J. Latessa

Edward J. Latessa

Edward J. Latessa received his Ph.D. from the Ohio State University in 1979 and is a Professor and Director of the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Latessa has published more than 150 works in the area of criminal justice, corrections, and juvenile justice. He is co-author of seven books including Corrections in the Community and What Works (and Doesn't) in Reducing Recidivism. Dr. Latessa has directed more than 150 funded research projects including studies of day reporting centers, juvenile justice programs, drug courts, prison programs, intensive supervision programs, halfway houses, and drug programs. He and his staff have also assessed more than 600 correctional programs throughout the United States, and he has provided assistance and workshops in more than 45 states. Dr. Latessa served as President of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (1989-90). He has also received several awards, including: the Marguerite Q. Warren and Ted B. Palmer Differential Intervention Award presented by the Division of Corrections and Sentencing of the American Society of Criminology (2010), the Outstanding Community Partner Award from the Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections (2010), the Maud Booth Correctional Services Award in recognition of dedicated service and leadership presented by the Volunteers of America (2010), the Community Hero Award presented by Community Resources for Justice (2010), the Bruce Smith Award for outstanding contributions to criminal justice by the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (2010), the George Beto Scholar (College of Criminal Justice, Sam Houston State University), 2009), the Mark Hatfield Award for Contributions in public policy research by The Hatfield School of Government at Portland State University (2008), the Outstanding Achievement Award by the National Juvenile Justice Court Services Association (2007), the August Vollmer Award from the American Society of Criminology (2004), the Simon Dinitz Criminal Justice Research Award from the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction (2002), the Margaret Mead Award for dedicated service to the causes of social justice and humanitarian advancement by the International Community Corrections Association (2001), the Peter P. Lejins Award for Research from the American Correctional Association (1999), the ACJS Fellow Award (1998), the ACJS Founders Award (1992), and the Simon Dinitz award by the Ohio Community Corrections Organization. In 2013, Latessa was named “one of the most innovative people in criminal justice” by criminal justice leaders and professionals in the United States in a national, multi-faceted survey about innovation and criminal justice reform conducted by the Center for Court Innovation in partnership with the Bureau of Justice Assistance and the U.S. Department of Justice.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Cincinnati

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Edward J. Latessa

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