Daniel B. Berch

Daniel B. Berch

Daniel B. Berch is Professor of Educational Psychology and Applied Developmental Science at the University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education. Prior to this position, he was Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development at the Curry School. Before coming to the University of Virginia, Professor Berch served as Associate Chief of the Child Development and Behavior Branch at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH. His previous federal service included a year spent as a Senior Research Associate at the U. S. Department of Education, advising the Assistant Secretary for Educational Research and Improvement. Professor Berch is a cognitive developmental psychologist with interests ranging from the development of numerical cognition and mathematical learning disabilities (MLD) to evolutionary perspectives on education. He has published articles on children’s magnitude representations, the development of number sense, and the role of working memory in MLD. He is senior editor of the book, Why is math so hard for some children? The nature and origins of mathematical learning difficulties and disabilities (co-edited by Michele Mazzocco). Among other honors, he received the NIH Award of Merit, was elected Fellow of the American Psychological Association’s Division of Experimental Psychology, served as an ex officio member of the U.S. Department of Education’s National Mathematics Advisory Panel commissioned by President George W. Bush, was elected to the Evolution Institute’s Scientific Advisory Board (and chair’s its Education Subcommittee), was appointed to the AIM Academy’s Research Advisory Board, and served as a member of the Professional Advisory Board of the National Center for Learning Disabilities for six years. During the past several years, Professor Berch has been working on the implications of evolutionary theory for educational research and practice, publishing a book chapter on instructing evolved minds, serving as one of the Evolution Institute’s primary organizers of a 2013 conference on evolutionary perspectives in educational research funded by the American Educational Research Association, and is co-author (with David Geary) of an article entitled “Evolutionary Approaches to Understanding Children’s Academic Achievement” to be published in Wiley’s forthcoming online reference work, Emerging Trends in the Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA