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Brain Machine Interfaces for Space Applications: enhancing astronaut capabilities
 
 

Brain Machine Interfaces for Space Applications: enhancing astronaut capabilities, 1st Edition

 
Brain Machine Interfaces for Space Applications: enhancing astronaut capabilities, 1st Edition,Dario Izzo,Luca Rossini,ISBN9780123748218
 
 
 

International Review of Neurobiology

Izzo   &   Rossini   

Academic Press

9780123748218

296

229 X 152

Print Book

Hardcover

In Stock

Estimated Delivery Time
USD 225.00
 
 

Key Features

* A pioneering book for a pioneering field
* Presents the application of cutting-edge brain machine interface technologies and concepts to support astronauts in space
* Of great interest to space scientists, neuroscientists, and biomedical engineers alike

Description

Among the most interesting fields in research are the emerging possibilities to interface the human brain directly with machines, e.g. with computers and robotic interfaces. The European Space Agency's Advanced Concept team as a multidisciplinary team from engineering, artificial intelligence, and neural engineering has been working on the cutting edge of exploring brain machine interfaces for application in space as solutions to limitations astronauts face in space, and this book for the first time presents the state-of-the-art-cohesively.

Readership

Space Science; Neuroscience; Bioinformatics; Bioengineers; Robotics

Dario Izzo

Luca Rossini

Brain Machine Interfaces for Space Applications: enhancing astronaut capabilities, 1st Edition

CONTENTS

Contributors......................................................................... xi
Foreword ............................................................................... xv
Preface ................................................................................... xvii

SECTION ONE

HYBRID BIONIC SYSTEMS

EMGBased and GazeTrackingBased Man-Machine Interfaces

Federico Carpi and Danilo De Rossi

I. Introduction ........................................................................ 4

II. EMGBasedInterfaces............................................................. 5

III. GazeTrackingBasedInterfaces.................................................. 12

IV. FinalRemark ....................................................................... 19
References .......................................................................... 19

Bidirectional Interfaces with the Peripheral Nervous System

Silvestro Micera and Xavier Navarro

I. Introduction ........................................................................ 24

II. OrganizationandFunctionofthePNS ........................................ 25

III. Nerve Electrodes:TypesandApplications..................................... 28

IV. Stimulationand RecordingNeuralSignals .................................... 31

V. BiomedicalApplications.......................................................... 33
References .......................................................................... 35

Interfacing Insect Brain for Space Applications

Giovanni Di Pino, Tobias Seidl, Antonella Benvenuto,
Fabrizio Sergi, Domenico Campolo, Dino Accoto,
Paolo Maria Rossini, and Eugenio Guglielmelli

I. Introduction ........................................................................ 40

II. Interfaces............................................................................ 41

III. SensoryandMotorMapping..................................................... 44

IV. ProposingaModelofHybrid Control Architecture ......................... 45

v

vi CONTENTS

V. ConclusionsandOutlook......................................................... 46
References........................................................................... 47

SECTION TWO

MEET THE BRAIN

Meet the Brain: Neurophysiology

John Rothwell

I. Introduction......................................................................... 52

II. HowDoNeuronsTransmit Information?...................................... 53

III. Synapses ............................................................................. 55

IV. TheMotorAreasofthe CerebralCortex....................................... 57

V. PlasticityofPrimaryMotorCortex .............................................. 63

VI. Conclusions ......................................................................... 64
References........................................................................... 65

Fundamentals of Electroencefalography, Magnetoencefalography, and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Claudio Babiloni, Vittorio Pizzella, Cosimo del Gratta,
Antonio Ferretti, and Gian Luca Romani

I. Introduction to Electroencephalography andMagnetoencephalography ................................................... 68

II. Physiological GenerationofEEG/MEGSignals............................... 69

III. EEG and MEG Techniques Allow the Study of Brain Rhythms............. 73

IV. FunctionalMagneticResonanceImaging ...................................... 74

V. Physiological Generation of Blood Oxygen LevelDependent Signal ...... 75

VI. TypicalfMRIExperimentalDesigns............................................. 77

VII. BOLDfMRITechniquesin Clinical Environment ............................ 77
References........................................................................... 78

Implications of Brain Plasticity to Brain-Machine Interfaces Operation:
A Potential Paradox?

Paolo Maria Rossini

I. Introduction......................................................................... 82

II. BrainPlasticity ...................................................................... 83

III. BrainPlasticityandBMISystems ................................................ 87

IV. MonitoringPlasticityDuringBMIControl ..................................... 88

V. Conclusions ......................................................................... 89
References........................................................................... 89

CONTENTS

SECTION THREE

BRAIN MACHINE INTERFACES, A NEW
BRAINTOENVIRONMENT COMMUNICATION CHANNEL

An Overview of BMIs

Francisco Sepulveda

I. Introduction ........................................................................ 94

II. MainElementsinaBMI.......................................................... 96

III. BMITypes........................................................................... 99

IV. BMIsandtheUser’sAbility...................................................... 102

V. Conclusion.......................................................................... 104
References .......................................................................... 104

Neurofeedback and Brain-Computer Interface: Clinical Applications

Niels Birbaumer, Ander Ramos Murguialday, Cornelia Weber, and Pedro Montoya

I. Introduction ........................................................................ 108

II. FunctionalMagnetic ResonanceImaging: fMRIBMI ........................ 109

III. BMIinLockedinSyndrome..................................................... 110

IV. BMIinStrokeandSpinalCordInjury ......................................... 112

V. Conclusion.......................................................................... 114
References .......................................................................... 115

Flexibility and Practicality: Graz Brain-Computer Interface Approach

Reinhold Scherer, Gernot R. MullerPutz, and Gert Pfurtscheller

I. Introduction ........................................................................ 120

II. GrazBCI ............................................................................ 120

III. Applications......................................................................... 122

IV. Discussion ........................................................................... 127
References .......................................................................... 129

On the Use of Brain-Computer Interfaces Outside Scientific Laboratories: Toward an Application in Domotic Environments

F. Babiloni, F. Cincotti, M. Marciani, S. Salinari, L. Astolfi,

F. Aloise, F. De Vico Fallani, and D. Mattia

I. Introduction ........................................................................ 134

II. Methodology........................................................................ 135

viii CONTENTS

III. Results................................................................................ 142

IV. Discussion ........................................................................... 144
References........................................................................... 146

Brain-Computer Interface Research at the Wadsworth Center:
Developments in Noninvasive Communication and Control

Dean J. Krusienski and Jonathan R. Wolpaw

I. Introduction......................................................................... 147

II. SensorimotorRhythmBasedBCIControl...................................... 149

III. P300BasedBCIControl........................................................... 152

  1. IV. CurrentandFutureDirections................................................... 154
  2. V. Conclusion .......................................................................... 155
    References........................................................................... 155

WatchingBrain TV and Playing Brain Ball: ExploringNovel BCI Strategies Using RealTime Analysis of Human Intracranial Data

Karim Jerbi, Samson Freyermuth, Lorella Minotti, Philippe Kahane, Alain Berthoz, and JeanPhilippe Lachaux

I. Introduction......................................................................... 160

II. MaterialsandMethods............................................................ 161

III. Results................................................................................ 161

IV. Discussion ........................................................................... 166
References........................................................................... 167

SECTION FOUR

BRAINMACHINE INTERFACES AND SPACE

Adaptive Changes of Rhythmic EEG Oscillations in Space:
Implications for Brain-Machine Interface Applications

G. Cheron, A. M. Cebolla, M. Petieau, A. Bengoetxea,

E. PalmeroSoler, A. Leroy, and B. Dan

I. Introduction......................................................................... 172

II. SpontaneousEEG Fluctuations:Whereisthe Baseline? ..................... 172

III. Howto Manage AlphaandMu Oscillationsin Space........................ 173

  1. IV. From the Identification Process to the Exploitation ofBrainOscillationsinSpace.................................................... 174
  2. V. The Influence of TopDown Dynamics on BCI Approach ............... 176

VI. Gamma EEG Oscillations: AWindow into Cognition, Perception, Attention, Binding,or MicrosaccadicEye Movements ....................... 179

VII. The Gating of the SomatosensoryEvokedPotentials asaNewToolsforBCI............................................................ 179 References........................................................................... 183

CONTENTS

Validation of Brain-Machine Interfaces During Parabolic Flight

Jose del R. Millan, Pierre W. Ferrez, and Tobias Seidl

I. Introduction ........................................................................ 189

II. Methods............................................................................. 190

III. ExperimentalResults.............................................................. 193

IV. Discussion ........................................................................... 196
References .......................................................................... 197

Matching Brain-Machine Interface Performance to Space Applications

Luca Citi, Oliver Tonet, and Martina Marinelli

I. Introduction ........................................................................ 200

II. Methods: PerformanceMeasuresofHBSs ..................................... 201

III. Materials............................................................................. 202

IV. Results:Matching InterfacesandDevices...................................... 205

V. PossibleDemonstrators ........................................................... 208

VI. Conclusions......................................................................... 209
References .......................................................................... 210

Brain-Machine Interfaces forSpace Applications-Research,Technological
Development, and Opportunities

Leopold Summerer, Dario Izzo, and Luca Rossini

I. Introduction ........................................................................ 214

II. AnOutlookonBMIResearchTrends.......................................... 215

III. Future Manned Space Programs-Planned or Envisioned.................. 217

IV. NextStepsTowardBMIsforSpaceApplications............................. 220

V. Conclusion.......................................................................... 221
References .......................................................................... 221

Index ...................................................................................... 225
Contents of Recent Volumes................................................ 231

 
 
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